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American Indians: Health Disparities Research

- American Indians have had health disparities as result of unmet needs and historical traumatic experiences that have lasted over 500 hundred years.1(p99) Since first contact American Indians have been exposed to infectious disease and death2(p19), more importantly, a legacy of genocide, legislated forcible removal, reservation, termination, allotment, and assimilation3. This catastrophic history had led to generational historical traumas and contributes to the worst health in the United States.2 American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/AN) represent 0.9 percent of the United States population4(p3) or 1.9 million AI/AN of 566 federally recognized tribes/nations.5 American Indians/Alaska Native...   [tags: alaska natives, american indians, health]

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Ten Little Indians (And Then There Were None) by Agatha Christie

- Ten Little Indians, published as And Then There Were None when it débuted in America brought a wonderful sense of mystery into the life of the American. Written by Agatha Christie, it was published in 1939 as a fiction murder mystery. The story is set on the coast of Devon, England during the thirties. Ten Little Indians is a classic murder mystery, which involves ten unsuspecting average people. While it seems that one of these people would be the main character, everyone is equally important in shaping the story....   [tags: Ten Little Indians]

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Navajo Indians See the Importance of Supporting their Families and Communities

- The Navajo nation is the largest U.S Indian tribe. It has more than 250,000 people. They are located in Northern New Mexico, a portion of southern Utah, and part of northern Arizona. They first descended from the Apaches, who came from the Pueblos. Their native language is Athapaskan. “Navajo” came from the word navahu’u meaning “farm fields in the valley.” The Spanish chroniclers first referred to the Navajos as Apaches de Nabajo’ meaning Apaches who farm in the valley. Then the name was eventually shortened to the Navajo....   [tags: Native Americans, American Indians,]

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Lasting Effects of European Colonization on Native American Indians.

- Effects of Colonisation on North American Indians Since the Europeans set foot on North American soil in 1620,they have had a devastating effect on the native population. I will be discussing the long term effect of North American colonisation on the Native Americans, focusing on such issues as employment opportunities, the environment, culture and traditions, health, as well as social justice. I will begin with the important issue of employment opportunities. The unemployment rate for Native Americans is a staggering 49%....   [tags: native americans, indians, colonial america]

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Collision between the Authorities of the General and State Governments on Account of the Indians

- It gives me pleasure to announce to Congress that the benevolent policy of the Government, steadily pursued for nearly thirty years, in relation to the removal of the Indians beyond the white settlements is approaching to a happy consummation. Two important tribes have accepted the provision made for their removal at the last session of Congress, and it is believed that their example will induce the remaining tribes also to seek the same obvious advantages. The consequences of a speedy removal will be important to the United States, to individual States, and to the Indians themselves....   [tags: tribes, indians, indian community]

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The History of the Wisconsin Indians

- The 1989-1991 Biennial Budget established a program that would support school districts’ efforts to give information about Wisconsin Indian history, culture, and tribal sovereignty. The exact year Act 31 took place was 1989 (information from Act 31 handout/lecture). I would like to teach at the high school level which is the grades nine through twelve. One course would be history. History is a very delicate topic when dealing with Wisconsin Native Americans. I would talk to the Native American students in my class, and I would ask them what they would be comfortable with me teaching....   [tags: Wisconsin Indians, Native Americans, USA, history,]

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The Saga of the Tigua Indians

- The Saga of the Tigua Indians The Saga of the Tigua Indians is an amazing one. By all reasoning they should have been wiped out long ago. There quiet defiance to change, however, has carried them through. From the height of civilization to near extinction the Tigua have remained. They endure imprisonment by the Spanish, oppression and manipulation by everyone that followed. This is the story of a people thought to extinct, that are once again learning to survive. Early histories of the Tigua Indians are conflicting and largely untrue....   [tags: Tigua Indians Native Americans Essays]

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Location and Description of the Algonkian Indians

- Location and Description of the Algonkian Indians - Algonkian lived in Quebec and Ontario; starting from the Ottawa valley, beneath Hudson Bay and above lower Ontario - the areas in which they lived in were dense woodlands with trees, such as, birch and evergreen; and snow covered the land most of the year. Adaptation to the physical Environment Home - Algonkian homes were called Wigwam, there frames were built out of saplings of tall, young tree trunks which were tied together with narrow strips of bark or root fibers, to form a dome shape - the frame was covered with woven mats or barks, then was firmly tied to the frames - light birch bark were used as covers in the summer and heavy e...   [tags: Algonkians Indians Native Americans Essays]

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How American Indians Have Adapted their Culture Since Colonization

- My essay will have an outlook of the history of the first Americans “Indians” and how they’ve adapted with their religion, subsistence strategy, social organization, and material culture. Over the years things have change in the history of Native Americans, prior to the reconstruction period, Native Americans knew who they were and what they lived for. Before the Europeans came and changed their living they one with nature and the land they’ve came to know. They believe that America was there’s and they lived free....   [tags: American Indians, Native Americans, Colonies]

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Yanomamo Indians

- This paper looks on Yanomamo Indians traits and describes their actual way of life; the basic question that might be asked will be answered: who they are, where do they live, how do they gather food to survive and what are their skills in this domain; also how these Indians are organized politically and how are the social relations among the families and between neighboring tribes. Then, how the devastation of the scientists and journalists have changed the Yanomamo Indians way of life in the current and past century, and if they kept the same aspects of their current religion of they ancestors even thought modern world have reached them....   [tags: Yanomamo Indians Culture]

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Review For The Woodlands Indians In The Western Great Lakes

- The Woodlands Indians in the Western Great Lakes. Robert E. Ritzenthaler and Pat Ritzenthaler. Prosper Heights, IL: Waveland Press, Inc. 1993. 154 pp. In each of the ten chapters that comprise this book, the authors address important features of the Woodlands Indians’ way of life that ensure their survival. They address such important issues as how they are able to find enough food to subsist and what exactly they do eat to subsist; as well as going into topics such as their religious beliefs, traditional ceremonies, their beliefs regarding shamanism and curative techniques, their material culture, games, music, and folklore that is important to them and influences who they are as a people....   [tags: Indians Book Review]

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Cherokee Indians

- Cherokee Indians The Cherokee Indians were one of the civilized tribes in the United States. They were located in the southeastern part of the U.S. This includes the western parts of North and South Carolina, The northern parts of Alabama and Georgia, Southwest Virginia and the Cumberland basin of Tennessee. It appears the Cherokee settled in 1000 A.D. to 1500 A.D. Their development took place in two stages or phases. The Pisgah which took place 1300 A.D. to 1540 A.D. and the Qualla which took place 1540 A.D....   [tags: History Indians Native Americans Essays]

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The Red Indians And The Black Indians

- In the history of United States, the red Indians and the Black peoples own a very unique and wondrous extent. They both suffered from a course of collective tragedy over nineteenth century. They have been misrepresented, stereotyped and simplified over time. Their stories cannot be simply condensed into one master narrative of defeat and decimation. To understand what really happened to them, we need to look at various historic pieces on the lives of many Indians, Blacks and Whites- that contributed to these multi-faceted stories....   [tags: Black people, Slavery in the United States]

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Health Care is One Of The Largest Issues Facing American Indians Today

- One of the largest issues facing American Indian's today One of the largest issues facing American Indian's today One of the largest issues facing the American Indian's today is that health care. As tribes and urban Indian health centers struggle along with the rest of the country to address the growing numbers of Elders in their communities. There are key issues and special considerations that must be addressed to ensure American Indian Elders are not forgotten in any proposed reform or redesign proposals that the newly formed Medicaid Commission or Congress put forth....   [tags: Native American Indians]

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A Southwestern Indian Culture Among Us Today: The Hopi Indians

- A Southwestern Indian Culture Among Us Today: The Hopi Indians Did you know that the Ancient Indian people of the Southwestern United States have dated back to the year 10,000 BC. First appearing toward the end of the last Ice Age, they were the first “Americans.” (Noble, 1998) When Christopher Columbus arrived in the America’s in 1492 and seeing the people of this land for the first time, he thought that he had landed in India, thus giving them the name “Indians.” (Noble, 1998) However, he was nowhere near India, or that region of the world....   [tags: Hopi Indians southwestern united states]

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Tepeticpac Indians and the Town of Tlaxcala

- Tlaxcala... It has what you like was founded in 1591 by a group of thirty families of tlaxcaltec, originating in the header of Tepeticpac, Indians who – as part of the project of colonization of the frontier chichimeca - months ago had been settled in Mexquitic. At this stage Tlaxcala, or Tlaxcalilla, it received the name of the town of Nuestra Señora de los Remedios, settling in the current founders Plaza. Later, between June and July next year and to facilitate the founding of the people of San Luis, along with the town of Santiago was moved near the Tlaxcala interchangeably known as river or Santiago....   [tags: Mexican Indian History, San Luis Potosi]

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Cultural Aspects of the Navajo Indians

- Culture gives definition to a group of people’s way of life. Culture defines people; It is who the people are. The Navajo Indians are a group located in the southwestern part of the United States with a distinct culture. They originated there sometime between the year “1200 and 1500” (Craats 4). Unlike the beginning of their residence in the United States, different aspects of the culture have changed, but the Navajo people still remain a culturally rich group of people. To this day, their political organization, economy, social organization, and religious beliefs are the four major elements that make them who they are as a whole....   [tags: Native American, Culture, Indian tribe]

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The Otomi Indians and Montecillo

- Montecillo... It has what you like a group of Otomi Indians around 1600 and tarascan avecindaron part of the ejidos in the East of the city of San Luis Potosí. The new settlement was small in size: only consisted of two leagues, measured in terms of the city towards the Cerro de San Pedro, and width less than a quarter of a League. The name of Montecillo, adopted from the outset by its inhabitants according to the titles of erection of the village, was derived from the fact that the lands they settled originally were rough, hilly and fruitless....   [tags: Mexican Indian History, San Luis Potosi]

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Indians of Native America

- The Cheyenne tribe of Native American Indians are what is now the most well known and prominent of Indian tribes that have ever settled in North America. They originally lived in villages, in some of the eastern parts of the country and occupied much of what is today, Minnesota, until they were forced to migrate to the Great Plains around 1800s (Grinnell). From being moved into the plains, the Cheyenne tribe separated into Northern Cheyenne and the Southern Cheyenne and their land ranged from the Missouri River to the Arkansas River....   [tags: indian tribes, the cheyenne, great plains]

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Laurence M. Hauptman's Between Two Fires: American Indians in the Civil War

- The American Civil War tore apart many American lives. These people lost loved ones, had to endure the pains of those who lost limbs, and deal with emotional needs. However American lives were not the only ones that suffered and fought the war. American Indians served for both the North and the South during the Civil War. There reasons was to what they could gain from the side the chose, pride for the land they lived in, and to Indians did not have much going for them at the time. From generals to privets they stood there ground and fought with pride....   [tags: American Citil War Indians Native Americans]

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The American Indians

- Subculture Assignment The American Indians are also known as Native Americans who are present within the United States and comprise varying ethnic groups and tribes and hold distinctive attributes which makes them different from the white Americans who are present in the society of the United States. The immigration to the US started from the 15th century due to which the society of the United States was seen to be holding distinctive tribes and immigrants who formed groups in the US and started achieving recognition in the US society....   [tags: Native Americans, Ethnic Groups. Tribes]

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The Tapirapé Indians

- In South America, there are many indigenous groups that have been studied and analyzed by anthropologists. The Tapirapé Indians is an indigenous Brazilian tribe that has a very interesting culture that has been influenced by other indigenous groups in Brazil, while being preserved from Europeans influences. Most ethnographic research about the Tapirapé Indians has been performed by Herbert Baldus and Charles Wagley from the early 1900’s to the 1970’s. In this paper, I will analyze the language, power, social relations, material practices, belief system and institutions and rituals of the Tapirapé Indians and discuss how each category plays a role in their culture....   [tags: Culture]

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The Ojibway Indians

- ... The Ojibway language is from the Algonquian language family. Ojibway words are very long and hard to pronounce. Here is a few of the Ojibway words translated into English. Mee-gwetch means thank you, Muckadaymashkeekiwabu is the word coffee, and Ahnimooshug is the Ojibway word for dogs. Weapons, Hunting, and Tools Ojibway warriors use bows, arrows, clubs, axes, and flails. A flail is a handle connected to a spiky ball with a chain. It was very hard to control. If they swung the chain the wrong way, the spiky ball could hit them and cause injury or death....   [tags: chippewa, ojibway, settlers]

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The Lakota Sioux Indians And The Tribe Of The Southern Plain Indians

- The Lakota Sioux Indians make up the majority of the Northern Plain Indians. They are located on the Pine Ridge reservation in South Dakota. It is the poorest county in the nation, with population estimates of the reservation range from 28,000 to 40,000. 80% of residents are unemployed (versus 10% in the rest of the country); 49% of the residents live below the Federal poverty level (including 61% of all those under the age of 18); Per capita income in Oglala Lakota County is $6,286; (www.census.gov) The area of the Pine Ridge Reservation is mostly rural and health care is given by the Indian Health Service (IHS)....   [tags: Health care provider, Health care, Blood sugar]

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The History of the Navajo Indians

- The Navajo Indians used to live in northwestern Canada and Alaska. 1,000 years ago the Navajo Indians traveled south, because there was more qualities they had seeked there. When the Navajo Indians traveled south there was a lot of oil in the 1940’s. Today the Navajo Indians are located in the Four Corners. The marriage practices for the Navajo Indians are very unique. The bride must be bought with horses, sheep, or other valuable items. What many Navajo Indians used to use in the 40’s were love potions....   [tags: Native Americans, informative]

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Christopher Columbus And The Indians

- Europeans of all nationalities came into contact with Indians while exploring the “New World”. The different nationalities of Europeans all treated the Indians differently. Some showed the Indians kindness, respect, and compassion. Others, however, were harsh towards the Indians showing no kindness, respect, or compassion. This cruelty had an exceptional role in creating the New World. The Europeans came over to the New World exploring and eventually took over the Indians by conquest. When the Europeans migrated to the New World they were not expecting to come into contact with any other human beings....   [tags: Europe, Christopher Columbus, Spain]

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The American Of The Cherokee Indians

- The English arrival to the United States caused the death of thousands of Native Americans. The Cherokees were one of the tribes that experienced the great changes the English caused in their arrival to the Americas. The Cherokee Indians had to learn to adjust in many ways, changes in language and the deaths of many Cherokees were just some of the hardships the Indians faced. The many challenges brought the Cherokees to lose much of their culture in the later years. From the start of the English meeting the Cherokee Indians in 1729, the two did not have a great relationship....   [tags: Native Americans in the United States]

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The Image Of North American Indians

- December 9th 2014 A Fruitful Myth The image of North American Indians as inherently attuned to the natural world is one of the many images associated with this group of people and their culture. Many people have come to believe the myth that Indians are more attuned with the environment than any other race. However, this image is in fact just that; an image. It is a false picture that has been painted into the minds of others. This false picture has been associated with North American Indians for centuries....   [tags: Native Americans in the United States]

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American Indians And European Americans

- Introduction Most people say change is good, but was it good for the many different cultural groups that migrated to and in America. Moving or living in a new place with different cultures can be challenging and trying to adapt can be difficult. Many are faced with a number of challenges with interfere with their lifestyles. An example is equal or fair treatment and the pressures to fit in with society. American Indians and European Americans have collectively been affected by public policy in ways that are both positive and negative....   [tags: Native Americans in the United States]

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Native Americans And The Cherokee Indians

- Sabrina Caldwell Laura Baker October 25, 2015 Cherokee Removal As Americans sought to expand their settlements into Cherokee land, the Cherokee faced three choices: assimilate, leave their native land, or defend their sovereignty. The Cherokee Indians had lived on these lands of thousands of years before the colonist claimed it for the United States. Five million acres of land in Georgia was trying to be peaceably obtained from the Indians. The Cherokee Indians having already given portions of their lands in numerous Georgia treaties wanted to hold onto what little land they had left....   [tags: Native Americans in the United States, Cherokee]

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Deontology in Jim and the Indians

- Jim has found himself in a quandary. When arriving in a South American town he has happened upon a captain and his army about to assassinate twenty Indians in order to deter other Indians protesting against the government. Jim is treated as a guest to the town and offered the privilege of shooting one of the Indians in which case the captain will let the other nineteen go, however declining this offer will mean the captain will carry on as planned and kill all twenty. Consequentialism is ordinarily distinct from deontology, as deontology offers rightness or wrongness of an act, rather than the outcome of the action....   [tags: rules, consequentialism, good will]

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American Indians And The Day Of The Dead

- For my cultural event I went to the event called American Indians and the Day of the Dead. This event covered two different cultures and described how they were connected through different aspects. For the first part of the event American Indians were the subject. The American Indian story is very rich in culture. Ever since the colonization of the America’s by the Europeans the Native American culture has be subject to unfair treatment and undeserved prejudice. This unfair treatment can be traced all the way back to when the Constitution was written....   [tags: Native Americans in the United States]

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The History Behind The Native Indians

- When I was reading the history behind the Native Indians, I learned about their culture and how it was very important to them. The culture assimilation of the Indians was how the country wanted the Native American culture become the European American culture. The Indians in general faced a lot of colonialism. They wanted to get rid of the Native American aspect. The Native Americans had a lot of cultural relativism due to settles trying to kick them out of their home. Another important thing to the Native Americans was the trading system, which the balance reciprocity was good for....   [tags: Native Americans in the United States, Cherokee]

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The Conquering of the Karankawa Indians

- The Karankawa Indians lived along the Gulf of Mexico in the coastal bend. Their territory ranged from the west end of Galveston bay southwestward to Corpus Christi bay. Contrary to popular belief the Karankawa were not cannibals. They did like many other Texas Indian tribes eat their captured enemy warriors and leaders to gain their strength or courage but never for food. The name Karankawa was given to many bands of Indians in the area including the Cocos, Copanes, Cujanes, Guapites, Carancaguases (the source of the name Karankawa)....   [tags: Gulf of Mexico Naive-Americans]

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Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians

- History of Cherokee Indians in the United States In the early nineteenth century, while the United States expanded into the lower south, white settlers faced a difficulty. That colony was already home for the Indians, and most Americans thought Cherokees were getting into their way of development. Even though the land was the Indian’s way of life, Americans decided to evacuate them. When Andrew Jackson took office, he pursued the Indian removal policy. Under his administration no less than ninety four treaties were made with the Indians, but the United States began moving them westward....   [tags: Native American history in the US]

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Apache Indians

- Apache Prisoners of War The Chiricahuas, who were once one of the most feared Native American tribes of the southwest, became prisoners of war by the United States for a period of twenty seven years. This period of time was the longest captivity a Native American tribe had ever been imprisoned. The Chiricahuas imprisonment began in 1886, when the United States Army transported four hundred Native Americans from San Carlos and Fort Apache reservations to army posts in Florida (Davis). By 1887, the bulk of the Chiricahuas had been transported to the Mount Vernon barracks in Alabama, and the rest of the dislocated band of Chiricahuas, including the now famous Geronimo were reunited by 1888 (Da...   [tags: Native American Indians]

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Summary : ' The Handbook Of The Indians Of California '

- ... There are no historical laws, but trends. No racial types and species showing an essential difference with others. No external factors or variants that affect the development of a culture. Comparative methods cannot be applied to history. From these postulates is obvious ideological separation he had with his teacher Franz Boas, by postulating that the man is determined by their culture and under the guidelines of a civilization. Kroeber differs again with his master, as it becomes one of the critics of this theory....   [tags: Anthropology, Franz Boas, Professor]

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The Era Of The Lenape Indians

- One of the very first electrified streets in the United States was Broadway. This gave it many opportunities to become a large icon for our nation. As we know now it is one of the most well-known places for great entertainment. However Broadway was not always the iconic entertainment center it is today; it was stolen, had New York City emerge around it, and persevered through many difficult economic and cultural times. Broadway started out as the main trading route of the Lenape Indians. The trail was known as the Wickquasgeck Trail and ran 15 miles through rough terrain (Purdy)....   [tags: New York City, Manhattan, Broadway]

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The American Of American Indians

- ... Let’s be real. Most europeans already knew that the native americans could not pay for those weapons. They wanted to rape for pleasure and enslave them to maximize profits. It was all a business and native americans were not smart enough to realize they were being used. These tactics they used were just to make them feel better and not guilty of what they are doing. They felt like they had to rape, kill, or enslave these native americans because they aren’t paying back their debt. In reality, it was all a fixed plan and they did it because of greed....   [tags: Native Americans in the United States]

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Conflicts Between Colonists and Indians

- In many situations, introducing a new party into a land that was formerly inhabited and assimilated by another party with completely different societal, political and cultural values results in a lengthy period of transition and conflict due to misunderstanding. Colonization and the interactions between colonists and Indians during the early stages of settlement in the New World was certainly no exception. Although European societies and political structures were hierarchical and left less to the impoverished members of society, Indian societies and political structures were not as patriarchal and featured communal cooperation....   [tags: Communication, Cooperation, Disease]

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American Indians Verses The Europeans

- American Indians verses The Europeans Europeans came over to America in 1492 changing the way the Natives lived forever. These natives were living tranquil and content lives. The Europeans came over to these innocent people’s land calling them savages, killed their people, and destroying the perfect lives they once had. There are many accounts recorded on how the Indians and Europeans felt about the discovery of America. The Natives believed they had a very sophisticated society before the Europeans came; but the Europeans believed the natives did not know how to live right and they needed their help to learn how to live the “correct” and “godly” way....   [tags: Christopher Columbus, United States]

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Bad Indians By Miranda Talks

- ... The letter conveys a controversy that Miranda speaks about throughout the the entire book. Indigenous people were subjugated. In reality, they were forced to become part of the Catholic church and they were forced to work for the missions. The sarcastic to serious tone in the letter conveys the reality of the Indigenous People. The seriousness of the letter shows a change in mood that shows how rough Indigenous People had it. It shows how this shouldn’t be taken lightly, but it should instead be taken as something that’s a very important issue in history....   [tags: Native Americans in the United States]

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The Zuni Indians Live, Today

- The Zuñi Indians live, today, on the Zuñi Reservation in west-central New Mexico. They occupying the north bank of the upper Zuni river valley of western New Mexico and Eastern Arizona since at least 700 A.D. (Theodore Frisbie; Encyclopedia), Resisters, is the best word to describe the Zuni people. They resisted acculturation. They resisted change to their ceremonial cycle. They are a complex people. They have survived because they have resisted (Arizona Rocks Tours), and unlike many other Native American tribes, the Zuñi Indians were never forced to leave their homelands and are even still living there today....   [tags: Marriage, Family, Kinship, Anthropology]

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American Indians and Alaska Natives

- The United States population growth rate continues to increase gradually by less than 1% per year. Over the past decade, American Indians and Alaska Natives (AIANs) population increased by 26.7%.1 According to 2010 census, there are approximately 5.2 million AIANs living in the United States representing 1.7% of the U.S. population.2 By 2050, the projected population of AIANs will reach an estimated 8.6 million.2 Alaska Natives (AN) comprise of the second largest population group in Alaska. They make up a bigger percentage of Alaska’s population than Native Americans in any other state....   [tags: population growth, alaska, natives]

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Lakota (Sioux) Indians and Creation

- ... Finally a young man decided to see what Iktomi was about, and came up. His name was Tokahe, and is now called the First. Tokahe was shown the wonders of the top soil by Iktomi and he then decided to bring his people up with him. He was telling them of the great things he had seen, but an Elder warned him of the danger. Tokahe was still determined to bring his people up, and so the Elder went out of the hole before the others and became the Buffalo Nation, to protect the people when danger arose....   [tags: Native American beliefs]

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Native Americans And American Indians

- As stated in the research questions the Native American are referred to and their involvement in the western plains. Native Americans and American Indians will be used into changeably throughout this work. In order to demonstrate the view that has been portrayed of them in this myth of the dangerous frontier, and to disprove their overarching place in the myth. The Jackson Turner commentary furthers the myth that Native Americans were the epicentre of the fears of the Frontier. The ideas of Frederick Jackson Turner in the later nineteenth century can be compared with the modern perceptions of borderlands encouraged by Patricia Nelson Limerick and Pekka Hamalianen, for example....   [tags: Native Americans in the United States]

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Mongols and Plains Indians

- Two cultures, thousands of miles apart, show similarities that would be expected of neighboring civilizations. Both cultures arose on similar terrain. This terrain was a luscious grassland. One civilization grew up in Midwest North America, the other in Central Asia. The first civilization was the Plains Indians. The second was the Mongols. Each culture had a common form of religion. This religion was shamanism. Wordiq defines it as "a range of traditional beliefs and practices that involve the ability to diagnose, cure, and sometimes cause human suffering because of a special relationship with, or control over, spirits." The cultures were also affected by the horse....   [tags: Comparative, Cultures]

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Indians in Unexpected Places

- Deloria, with his analytical survey, Indians in Unexpected Places, recounts the synthesis of western white expectations, and American Indians. The book takes its title from the general thesis, which explores not only the relationship between Indians and their introduction into an alien culture, but also the expectations that we have of Indians and how they “should” interact with our white western culture. According to Deloria, the common notion is that, “Indian people, corralled on isolated and impoverished reservations, missed out on modernity- indeed, almost missed out of history itself.” (Deloria p....   [tags: Non-Fiction Literature, persuasive]

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Western Indians

- In the late nineteenth century the expansion to the west increased the American culture. Since population was growing they needed to satisfy demands equally for every person. The idea of Manifest Destiny was used as a justification for the expansion and westward movement. Natives Americans were against the thought Americans had about the West. As a result Americans put a number of policies that helped remove the Natives Americans of the West. Americans were trying to destroy the culture Natives had....   [tags: Native American Indian History]

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American Indians

- American Indians form one of the minorities groups in America. Yet their native soil has the leading population in the world. America was inclined by their viewpoint before the first settler. Many of the Indians came to America as early as the turn of the century, in which they were deprived of residency until a congressional act was approved in 1946(Lee 106). Most Indians have supplied abundant assistance to the culture and flawless being of US; majorities of these donations regulate to the science field....   [tags: Native Americans, American History]

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Indians and the Frontier

- Indians and the Frontier The frontier after the Civil War was changed just like the rest of America. Immigrants flocked here from all over the globe. This led to huge population increases, which meant that more land was to be used. The frontier was slowly divided among the masses, and people began claiming their stakes. With the land being devoured, the Indians felt that they were being denied the rights to what was theirs. The Indians were greatly outnumbered, and out skilled. In one of the last deciding battles, Wounded Knee, the Indians lost one-hundred and forty-six dead, and fifty-one injured, where as the U.S....   [tags: Papers]

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American Indians

- The American Indians Between 1609 To 1865 The Native Americans or American Indians, once occupied all of the entire region of the United States. They were composed of many different groups, who speaked hundreds of languages and dialects. The Indians from the Southwest used to live in large built terraced communities and their way of sustain was from the agriculture where they planted squash, pumpkins, beans and corn crops. Trades between neighboring tribes were common, this brought in additional goods and also some raw materials such as gems, cooper....   [tags: essays research papers Native American Indian]

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Lakota Indians

- Lakota History Throughout North American expansion the Lakota people have suffered some of the worst and straight forward persecutions against Native American Indians, and live in some of the poorest if not the poorest conditions in the United States. This is sad for a people who use to be one of the strongest nations in the Central Plains, feared by white men and other Indian nations alike for their ferocity and warrior abilities in the heat of battle. The Lakota arrived at positions of dominance because of their success in controlling live¬stock, land, trading rights, and people....   [tags: Native American Indian History]

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The California Act For The Government And Protection Of Indians

- ... 2016. United States. National Park Service. "Five Views: An Ethnic Historic Site Survey for California (American Indians)." National Parks Service. U.S. Department of the Interior, n.d. Web. 03 Apr. 2016. 5. Indian Boarding Schools – Describe the immediate and lasting impacts of the boarding schools and American Indians. 5. Indian boarding schools were used to educate Indian children the culture and tradition of European/American standards, often converting them to Christianity. The head of Indian Affairs was a man named Thomas Jefferson Morgan, who set up a national idea of sending all Indian children to boarding schools to deny them of the cultural rights and set up a system where pol...   [tags: Native Americans in the United States]

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Native American Indians And Native Americans

- Native Americans were known to be indigenous people because they were always settling in particular regions, so they were known as natives to the lands of America. Later on, Native Americans were known as American Indians. The Native Americans got their name from the first explorer of America, named Christopher Columbus. Christopher Columbus thought that he reached the Indies when he first came to America and so he decided to call the group native residents or “people of India” (Schaefer). Some of the Indian groups are The Cherokees, Navajos, Latin American Indians, Choctaw, Sioux, Chippewa, Apache, Blackfeet, Iroquois and Pueblo (Schaefer)....   [tags: Cherokee, Native Americans in the United States]

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The Conflict Between Virginian Settlers And Indians

- Even though the critical aid of Indians had saved the settlers in Virginia from extinction, conflict—rooted in both ideological and practical reasons—was a prevalent tone in the relations between Virginian settlers and Indians during the 17th century. The undesirable relations began in the first months of the Jamestown colony. The early colonists in Jamestown viewed the Indians as savages and expressed hostility towards them. Captain John Smith established an unstable relationship with the Indians, occasionally stealing food from them....   [tags: Native Americans in the United States, Colonialism]

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North American Indians

- As the first ethnographer of Indian culture, George Catlin plays a vital role by offering the western eye a glimpse into the “uncivilized” North American Indian culture—both pictorially and textually. Following the Lewis and Clark expedition, Catlin took it upon himself to set out and paint prominent Indian leaders in their traditional attire, as well as to document his experiences through a series of letters. Catlin’s work, North American Indians, stands out as a valuable time capsule for the modern reader....   [tags: Ethnology, Catlin]

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Spanish Explorers And The South American Indians

- Professori Mark Bocija History 1111 Rezvan Ngalla December 9, 2015 Spanish Explorers and the South American Indians Long before European arrival and settlement, religious and cultural differences was part of the landscape of America. The indigenous people of this land were separated by language, landscape and ritual practices. When most European explorers arrived in the Americas, they did not even consider that the people they met and encountered had cultural and religious values that were different from their own....   [tags: Indigenous peoples of the Americas, Latin America]

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The Cheyenne Tribe Of Native American Indians

- The Cheyenne Tribe of native american indians are one of the most well known tribes in the plains. Originally in the 1600’s the Cheyenne Tribe lived in stationary villages in the east part of the country. They would rely on farming to make money and to feed their family. The Cheyennes occupied what is now Minnesota. In the 1700’s the Cheyennes migrated to North Dakota and settled on a river. The river provides a source of fresh water and many animals would go there so hunting would be easier.In 1780 a group of indians called the “Ojibwas” forced them out and they crossed the Missouri River and followed the buffalo herd on horseback....   [tags: Native Americans in the United States]

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American Indians and World War II

- By 1940, Native Americans had experienced many changes and counter-changes in their legal status in the United States. Over the course of the nineteenth century, most tribes lost part or all of their ancestral lands and were forced to live on reservations. Following the American Civil War, the federal government abrogated most of the tribes’ remaining sovereignty and required communal lands to be allotted to individuals. The twentieth century also saw great changes for Native Americans, such as the Citizenship Act and the Indian New Deal....   [tags: American History, World History]

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Attempts to Spread Christianity to the Pueblo Indians

- ... They were not a closed minded people, saying my way or no way, instead they were open to listening to the views of others. They would attend the Spanish masses and other church services; as a result the Spanish took it as a sign of their willing acceptance to Catholicism. However they had no intention of letting Christianity completely take the place of their own traditional religion. They we’re willing to add Christian components to their own religion, but not replace theirs with Christianity....   [tags: religion, covert, spanish]

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Indians : Textualism, Morality, And The Problem Of History

- ... After Tompkins recounts her academic journey through historical texts, which she calls the purpose of her essay, and analyzes the epistemological consequences of this narrative, the conclusion of her essay returns, partially, to the pragmatic and moral importance of modern Native American issues. Despite being fully aware of these issues by this point in her study, Tompkins’ understanding simply stems a self-awareness of her own failings, and she laments in the final sentence of her essay: “The moral problem that confronts me now is… that the work I do is not directed towards solving the kinds of problems that studying the history of European-Indian relations has awakened me to” (9)....   [tags: Native Americans in the United States]

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The Indians Must Worship The Great Spirit

- When Europeans first arrived in the Americas and encountered Native Americans, they viewed them as primitive and uncivilized people. This is evident through the journals and accounts of many explorers of the time, such as Christopher Columbus. They sought to civilize these people through Christianity and convert them to their way of life. However, the Native Americans were far from what the European explorers believed them to be. They were in fact quite intellectual and spiritual people. Literature that make this evident is the famous speech by the eloquent Native American chief, Red Jacket, entitled “The Indians must Worship the Great Spirit in their Own Way.” There are many notable differe...   [tags: Native Americans in the United States]

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Ravages Of Alcohol On American Native Indians

- ... The warm spot grew, his breath returned within the next two hours a miracle seem to happen and he opened his eyes and began to speak and he spoke of a great vision given to him by four messengers. (Skinner, 1915) The messengers gave him instructions and showed him of the evils of the white man’s “fire water”, and how it was sent to destroy the Indians and it should not be drank. They also gave messages of peace and harmony, of how to lead betters lives that would reunite the people. Avoid gossip and fights, be kind to children and their elders, be faithful to their wives, and be caring of others....   [tags: Native Americans in the United States]

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Career Goals Of The Baseball For The Cleveland Indians

- Career Paper Over the course of my life, I have had many different career goals which included becoming a teacher, a crime scene investigator or an athletic trainer. However, the one thing that I wanted to do more than anything else was to become the first woman to play Major League Baseball for the Cleveland Indians. As I got older, I realized that the opportunity for a woman to play Major League Baseball was very uncommon. I began thinking of other ways that I could still be involved with baseball as part of my future career....   [tags: Physical therapy]

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Counselor And Client Characteristics Of The American Indians

- ... The Ojibwe tribe, on the other hand have seven traditional values and they are: “love, courage, honesty, wisdom, humility, and truth” (Gray and Rose, 2012, p. 83). Then a counselor has to look at the age of the Native American client that they are counseling, because even though they are a part of a tribe they still have individual differences. Native American’s perspective on things differ than perspectives of the Western Culture. For example, Native Americans considers cooperation as a personal orientation....   [tags: Native Americans in the United States]

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Tapestry of a Tribe: The Story of the Ute Indians

- “You think you own whatever land you land on The earth is just a dead thing you can claim But I know every rock and tree and creature Has a life, has a spirit, has a name.” ~Disney's Pocohontas And so it is with the Ute Indians, a people whose great respect and admiration for the land and its inhabitants weaves in and out of their culturally rich heritage like threads in a tapestry. Not unlike other Native American tribes, the Utes feel a deep connection to the land that is their home. Everything they believe and all they do is a direct result of this connection....   [tags: Native American History ]

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Social History of the Africans and Indians In Florida

- African slaves and the Indigenous people of the Southern United States and Northern Mexico were targets of harsh and racist treatment by both the European and American white colonizers. Due to the marginalization of African slaves and Native American peoples the question of how they responded to this oppression has hardly been explored by historians. Scholars have written extensively about the separate lives of both these groups of people, including their interactions with white Europeans, but less is known about how these two groups interacted with one another....   [tags: interactions in Florida, American history]

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The Passamaquoddy Indians

- The Passamaquoddy Indians For several hundred years people have sought answers to the Indian problems, who are the Indians, and what rights do they have. These questions may seem simple, but the answers themselves present a difficult number of further questions and answers. State and Federal governments have tried to provide some order with a number of laws and policies, sometimes resulting in state and federal conflicts. The Federal Government's attempt to deal with Indian tribes can be easily understood by following the history of Federal Indian Policy....   [tags: Papers]

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The Anasazi Indians

- The Anasazi Indians From the scattered references made about the ancient Anasazi Indians in Tony Hillerman's A Thief of Time, one can identify several cultural characteristics of this mysterious tribe. One can discover how they lived, where they lived, their religion, simple day to day activities, and mysteries about their culture. Even though many references are made about this tribe, people will never know the truth, for there is an unsolved mystery to why the Anasazi disappeared. Even to this day no one knows what happened to them....   [tags: essays research papers]

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The Apache Indians

- The Apaches, like most Native Americans, have no written history other than that written by white men. But the story of the Apaches did not begin in the American Southwest but in the northwestern corner of North America, the western Subarctic region of Alaska and Canada. The Apache Indians belong to the southern branch of the Athabascan group, whose languages constitute a large family, with speakers in Alaska, western Canada, and American Southwest. The fact that the Apaches originated in the western mountainous Subarctic region makes their nomadic behavior after the arrival in the American Southwest more comprehensible; the tribes of the Southwest were highly mobile and moved from place to...   [tags: essays research papers]

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The Comanche Indians

- The Comanche Indians The Comanche have most recently been found in the Southern Plains, which stretches from Nebraska to the northern part of Texas. They were fully in Texas by the 1700’s. It is believed that the Comanche derived from the Shoshone Indians, found in Wyoming. The language spoken by the Comanche is actually a form of Uto-Aztecan language that when compared to the Shoshone language, the two are very similar. The Comanche’s were great warriors and did not really indulge in religious practices too much nor did they use folktales or legends very often....   [tags: Papers]

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The Blackfoot Indians

- The Blackfoot Indians The wind blows across the lone prairie, causing the golden heads of grass to sway in a synchronized motion. On the horizon stands a herd of buffalo with bowed heads silhouetted by the slowly sinking sun. In the east stands an Indian war party mounted on horseback, each individual in different multicolored attire, all with either bows or spears in hand. As they move in for the attack, the mystical scene slowly fades from vision.... This dreamlike scene was once everyday life to the American Indian before they were robbed of all that made their life real....   [tags: essays research papers]

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The Hopi Indians

- The Hopi Indians In the southwestern United States, above northern Arizona, are three mesas. The mesas create the home for the Hopi Indians. The Hopi have a deeply religious, isolated, tribal culture with a unique history. The Hopi stress group cooperation. The tribe is organized around a clan system. In a clan system, all the members consider themselves relatives. The clans form a social glue that has held the Hopi villages together. Clan membership provides a singular Hopi identity. The Hopi have a highly developed belief system which contains many gods and spirits....   [tags: American America History]

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The Mandan Indians

- The Mandan Indians were a small, peaceful tribe located at the mouth of the Knife River on the Missouri near present day Bismarck, North Dakota. The Mandan were most known for their friendliness and their homes, called earth lodges. The women of the Mandan tribe tended their gardens, prepared food, and maintained lodges while the men spent their time hunting or seeking spiritual knowledge. The Mandan Indians performed many ceremonies such as the Buffalo Dance and the Okipa Ceremony that have been the center of great interest to many historians....   [tags: American America History]

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The Cherokee Indians

- The Cherokee Indians The American Indian History in the Eastern part of the country is always associated with the Cherokee Indian nation. The Cherokee's were by far the largest and most advanced of the tribes when Europeans first arrived and came in contact with Native Americans. There are too many tribes to go over background on every one of them, so I'm going to focus on the Cherokee's since many of their ways and customs are so similar to all the other tribes in the East. When Europeans first arrived in North America, the Cherokees occupied a large expanse of territory in the Southeast....   [tags: essays research papers]

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The Creek Indians

- The Creek Indians Location and Background The early English traders gave the Creek native Americans their name because they usually built their villages on or near creeks or rivers. If they were to still have their villages it would include areas of Northern Florida and Eastern Louisiana and Southern Tennessee. The majority of the villages were located along the banks of the Coosa, Tallaposa, Flint, Ocmulgee, and Chattachoochee rivers. The native word for the most powerful band of Creeks was the "Muskogees"....   [tags: American America History]

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The Pueblo Indians

-  The Pueblo Indians are the historic descendants of the Anasazi peoples, also known as the “Basket Makers”. The Pueblo people live in several locations in northeastern Arizona and northwestern New Mexico in compact, permanent settlements known as pueblos. Pueblo means village or town in Spanish. The Pueblos were first encountered by the Spanish in 1539, by the Spanish Franciscan missionary Marcos de Niza. A year later the Spanish explorer Francisco Vaasquez de Coronado, searching for the legendary Seven Cities of Ciibola, led an expedition among the Hopi people....   [tags: essays research papers]

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Cherokee Indian Marriages

- Although there are several beliefs on how the Cherokee first arrived historical evidence shows they inhabited southeastern North American between A.D. 1000 and 1500 (Boudinot, 1829). Elias (1829) found The Trail of Tears to be “the best known episode in history as well as the worst,” for this devastating event forced relocation of the Indians from their home land in the southeast to a new unfamiliar land in Oklahoma. Thousands of Indians were forced from their homes with no warning and directed to march in the middle of winter to Oklahoma (Boudinot, 1829)....   [tags: American Indians]

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Indian Removal Act Forced The Cherokee Indians

- In history classes students were taught about the Cherokee Indians, who they were and what happened to them. The Indian Removal Act forced the Cherokee Indians to relocate to another place because European settlers wanted their land. What followed was the Trail of Tears. It was a gruesome journey to the southeastern regions for the Cherokee Indians. Many died and suffered before even reaching their destination. Remnants of the trail and their housing can still be seen today. They were a huge part of the American history but where are they today....   [tags: Native Americans in the United States, Cherokee]

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