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Native American Culture : Native Americans

- Native American Culture Have You ever thought about the people who inhabited this land before it was stolen from them. Do you know who they were besides the false name they are given, the things they’ve accomplished and how they have helped us today. in this paper you will learn about the life and hardship the original Americans have endured for over 300 years. Native American way of life Many Native Americans lived like we do, providing food,clothes and homes for their families....   [tags: Native Americans in the United States]

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The Language Of Native American Storytelling

- ... Storytelling is also a powerful method of conveying a tribe’s symbiotic relationship with nature. The role of storyteller was highly revered in Native American culture. Storytellers were often given the honored title of “Hair Twister”, and were believed to have the ability to hear the heartbeat of Father Sky and Mother Earth. Although the stories from one tribe might greatly differ from another, Hair Twisters from every tribe focused on common themes such as the origin of all things, the general well-being of the community, individual responsibility, and honoring the environment....   [tags: Native Americans in the United States]

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Native American’s, Stereotypes, Discrimination, and Ethnocentrism

- Many races are unjustly victimized, but Native American cultures are more misunderstood and degraded than any other race. College and high school mascots sometimes depict images of Native Americans and have names loosely based on Native American descent, but these are often not based on actual Native American history, so instead of honoring Native Americans, they are being ridiculed. According to the article Warriors Survive Attack, by Cathy Murillo (2009) some “members of the Carpentaria community defended Native American mascot icons as honoring Chumash tradition and the spirit of American Indian Warriors in U.S....   [tags: Native American Culture]

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Native American Mascots Should Not Be Banned

- The use of Native American mascots in colleges, universities, high schools, middle schools, elementary schools, sports teams, and groups in today’s society is a highly contentious topic. While some may argue that Native American themed mascots are harmless and non-offensive, others feel that they are unequivocally racist and offensive to the Native American culture and people. It has been proven that racist portrayals of Native Americans are regarded as being acceptable in most schools; while racist portrayals of other ethnic groups are never an acceptable behaviour....   [tags: Native Americans in the United States]

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Integrating Holistic Modalities into Native American Alcohol Treatment

- Alcoholism is identified by severe dependence or addiction and cumulative patterns of characteristic behaviors. An alcoholic’s frequent intoxication is obvious and destructive; interfering with the ability to socialize and work. These behavior patterns may lead to loss of work and relationships (Merck, 1999). Strong evidence suggests that alcoholism runs in families (Schuckit, 2009). According to a study published by Schuckit (1999) monozygotic twins were at a significantly higher risk of alcoholism if one twin was an alcoholic....   [tags: Native Americans ]

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Native Americans During The American Civil War

- ... After the American victory during the Revolution and the War of 1812, the Native Americans had no choice but to live alongside the Americans and practice the Guerilla warfare again, this time with the Americans on their side( Jaimes 350). During the preparing days of the civil war, these warfare tactics were greatly desirable. Their stealthiness and observation skills were recruited by both sides of the war, and two of the large tribes noteworthy of joining the war were the “Creeks… For the North”( Jaimes 350) and the “Choctaw and Chickasaw…favoring the South”(Hagan 100)....   [tags: Native Americans in the United States]

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The United States And Its Influence On Native American Culture

- The 1800’s in America was discreetly a time of harsh and radical reform for the Native population. The United States and its people sought to inform the Native Americans on proper culture and civility. Missionaries and the message of God was the unfortunate bridge between the gap of these two nations. As Karl Marx had said religion became an opium for the masses. Christianity was the governments opium to the Natives and they used religion to control the Indians. Unequivocally the pretenses behind teaching the Natives the gospel in the Bible was aberrant and immoral....   [tags: Native Americans in the United States]

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Native American Spiritual Beliefs

- I have decided to discuss the topic of Spirituality in Native Americans. To address this topic, I will first discuss what knowledge I have gained about Native Americans. Then I will discuss how this knowledge will inform my practice with Native Americans. To conclude, I will talk about ethical issues, and dilemmas that a Social Worker might face working with Native American people. In approaching this topic, I first realized that I need to look up some general information about Native Americans in the United States....   [tags: Native American]

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Native American Emigration : Native Americans

- ... The pilgrims were amongst the first to arrive. These new settlers with the help of Natives were able to flourish. The introduction of corn and tobacco gave Europeans the leverage to trade for fur pelts, fish, and wild game also granting them free passageway among different regions of the new world. With the continuing expansion of Europeans, treaties were set to grant settlers right of way to explore new lands and colonize. Fearing this sudden expansion that spread like wildfire Native American’s began to migrate west avoiding American settlements....   [tags: Native Americans in the United States]

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Native American Indians And Native Americans

- Native Americans were known to be indigenous people because they were always settling in particular regions, so they were known as natives to the lands of America. Later on, Native Americans were known as American Indians. The Native Americans got their name from the first explorer of America, named Christopher Columbus. Christopher Columbus thought that he reached the Indies when he first came to America and so he decided to call the group native residents or “people of India” (Schaefer). Some of the Indian groups are The Cherokees, Navajos, Latin American Indians, Choctaw, Sioux, Chippewa, Apache, Blackfeet, Iroquois and Pueblo (Schaefer)....   [tags: Cherokee, Native Americans in the United States]

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Negative Impact Of Differing Beliefs And Misjudgments On Native American And Spanish Relations

- Negative Impact of Differing Beliefs and Misjudgments on Native American and Spanish Relations The different beliefs that Native Americans and the Spanish had and the misjudgments they had about each other, were key sources for the violent conflict that arose between the two. These differences, and misjudgments by the Spanish can be seen through the stories of the Iroquois Native Americans and the writings of Bartolome de Las Casas. One source of discord between the two groups was there different ways of looking at land itself and how it was to be treated....   [tags: Native Americans in the United States, Religion]

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The American Of The Native Americans

- ... The Native Americans set up camp in these places, exiled from the fruitful lands that were always their homes. The Indian Removal Act promoted physical, as well as emotional and spiritual exile for the Native Americans. In their culture, their land and the nature surrounding them is very sacred. So when they are unrightfully removed from their holy lands, it becomes a source of unrest in many facets of the Native American’s life. Some scholars, such as Saddik Gohar, believe this exile is related to the exile of Palestinians from Israel for many reasons....   [tags: Native Americans in the United States]

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William Apess : The Bold Voice Of The Native Americans

- William Apess: The Bold Voice of the Native Americans William Apess broke the mold by writing this autobiography titled A Son of the Forest in 1829, considering it was not a common literary form for his time. Apess also set the bar as the earliest autobiography written and published by a Native American. Throughout the piece we learn his highs and lows, the prejudices he encountered, his different jobs, and his ordainment as a minister. Apess was the child of a mixed-race shoemaker, and a slave/indentured servant....   [tags: Native Americans in the United States, Race]

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American Treatment of Native Americans

- Before, during, and after the Civil War, American settlers irreversibly changed Indian ways of life. These settlers brought different ideologies and convictions, such as property rights, parliamentary style government, and Christianity, to the Indians. Clashes between the settlers and Indians were common over land rights and usage, religious and cultural differences, and broken treaties. Some Indian tribes liked the new ideas and began to incorporate them into their culture by establishing written laws, judicial courts and practicing Christianity, while other tribes rejected them (“Treatment”)....   [tags: history, native americans]

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Native American Ritual Dancing

- Native American Ritual Dancing “It has often been said that the North American Indians ‘dance out’ their religions” (Vecsey 51). There were two very important dances for the Sioux tribe, the Sun Dance and the Ghost Dance. Both dances show the nature of Native American spirituality. The Ghost Dance and the Sun Dance were two very different dances, however both promote a sense of community. “The Sun Dance was the most spectacular and important religious ceremony of the Plains Indians of 19th-century North America” (Lawrence 1)....   [tags: Native Americans Rituals Traditions Dance Essays]

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Native American Religion

- When Europeans first set foot upon the shores of what is now the United States they brought with them a social structure which was fundamentally based around their concept and understanding of Western European Christianity. That the indigenous peoples might already have a thriving civilization, including religious beliefs and practices, that closely paralleled the beliefs and practices of European civilization, was a concept not considered by these early explorers and settlers. This European lack of cultural understanding created tensions, between Native Americans and Europeans, and later between Native Americans and Euro-Americans, that eventually erupted into open warfare and resulted in g...   [tags: Native American Culture]

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Native American History

- Popular culture has shaped our understanding and perception of Native American culture. From Disney to literature has given the picture of the “blood thirsty savage” of the beginning colonialism in the new world to the “Noble Savage,” a trait painted by non-native the West (Landsman and Lewis 184) and this has influenced many non native perceptions. What many outsiders do not see is the struggle Native American have on day to day bases. Each generation of Native American is on a struggle to keep their traditions alive, but to function in school and ultimately graduate....   [tags: American Indian Culture]

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Cultural Differences Between Native Americans and the American Colonists

- When the colonists came to America, they classified the Native Americans as complete brutal savages. But was that a correct assumption. The Native Americans lived a life that was a complete opposite from the way that the Europeans were accustomed to. The Native Americans believed that the land was shared by everyone and not one person could own it. The Native Americans also had a polytheistic religion which completely went against the beliefs of the colonists. The colonists viewed the Native Americans as savages and barbarians because their ways of living were different....   [tags: american history, American Indians, Colonial Ameri]

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Native Peoples : Native Tribes

- ... On October 28,2015 Professor Schacner touched on this question in his lecture. Schachner talked about the creation of the field of Anthropology and how it was created to study Non-Western Groups. However, the study of these groups was developed from the prospective that Native peoples would not remain in existence for much time. Along with this belief it was believed that the viewpoint of Native peoples did not matter in this search of understanding. Not taking Native peoples prospective into account is problematic for a multitude of reasons....   [tags: Native Americans in the United States]

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Native American Peoples And The English Settlers

- The Native American peoples and the English settlers viewed each other differently, and these different interpretations shaped their perspectives on each other’s way of living. The English viewed Native Americans as a lesser because they did not abide to their religion. The differences that separated them were things such as religion, lifestyles, and political structure. Because of their cultural differences, the gender roles varied in each settlement. Also, since Native American’s viewed the English settlers as a source of trade and way of improving social status within their tribe, once their relationship with the settlers became violent the natives could not sustain a normal way of living...   [tags: Native Americans in the United States]

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Native American Culture : The United States

- ... They may struggle for personal and cultural survival from the dominant culture to keep their identity alive. A way to relate to these students would be to not assume that your policies, procedures, and instructional strategies are understood and valued. Sending frequent communications home that invite questions, reactions, and suggestions will create a positive relationship. By allowing those in the classroom to have time to talk and discuss the importance of their perspective and culture will create a welcoming environment....   [tags: Native Americans in the United States]

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Native American Mascots : Native Americans And A Glimpse Of Century Old Racism

- Native Americans and a glimpse of century old racism Since 1970, over 2,000 high schools and colleges have dropped their Native American-themed mascots (Lowe). Mascots that stereotype a certain race or minority in any way is almost always racist and offensive. Indian mascots do not only lower self-respect for native American adults and children but completely disrespect their culture and religion. Just like the imagery of slavery or poor Irish immigrants, Indian mascots not only paint a portrait of twenty-first-century racism but is also a constant reminder of the most oppressed minority in the United States of America....   [tags: Native Americans in the United States]

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Native Americans And The European Settlers

- ... Despite having only a simple form of governance, the tribes were impressively egalitarian and democratic as noted by the European colonists that first encountered them. A commonality between Native American politics and those of the Old World was the need for leaders to possess exceptional oratory skills (Divine 7). Familial relations were very important in Native American cultures as kinship was often the marker for status and place in society (Divine 7). Unlike typical families in Europe, who lived in traditionally separate homes apart from much of their extended relatives, Native American tribes shared communal living spaces with multiple different families living under the same roof....   [tags: Native Americans in the United States]

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The Issue Of Native Americans Mascots

- Introduction In recent months the issue of Native Americans mascots has resurfaced in the media. This time the debate revolved around public schools that are still using the derogatory term “Redskins” as a name, mascot, or nickname. This month California became the first state to ban the use of “Redskins” as the team name, mascot, or nickname of any public school. Although the issue of Native Americans being used as mascots is not a new issue the recent legislation passed by Gov. Jerry Brown has once again brought this issue to the surface....   [tags: Native Americans in the United States]

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Native Americans: Good or Evil People

- Over the course of history, there have been many different views of Native Americans, or Indians, as many have referred to them. Some have written about them in a positive and respectful manner while others have seen them as pure evil that waged war and killed innocent men, women, and children. No matter what point of view one takes, though, one thing is clear and that is if it were not for these people the early settlers would not have survived their first year in the new land now called the United States of America....   [tags: Native Americans]

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The Depiction Of Native Americans

- The depiction of Native Americans to the current day youth in the United States is a colorful fantasy used to cover up an unwarranted past. Native people are dressed from head to toe in feathers and paint while dancing around fires. They attempt to make good relations with European settlers but were then taken advantage of their “hippie” ways. However, this dramatized view is particularly portrayed through media and mainstream culture. It is also the one perspective every person remembers because they grew up being taught these views....   [tags: Native Americans in the United States]

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Native American Medicine and Spiritual Healing

- Throughout time, mankind has persistently been seeking ways to maintain their health and to cure those that had not been so fortunate in that task. Just about everything has been experimented with as a cure for some type of illness; whether physical, spiritual or mental. There has always been evidence of spiritual healing and it will continue to be an important part of any healing process, large or small. In particular the roots of Native American Medicine men (often a woman in some cultures) may be traced back to ancient times referred to as Shaman....   [tags: spiritual healing, medicine, Native Americans, Sha]

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Native American Female Artist : Roxanne Swentzell

- ... In today’s Santa Clara pueblo, there thrives an economy which is sustainable for the natives to live and find jobs on the inside (though there are those who seek occupations elsewhere), excellent education programs, a strong sense of cultural identity, and festivals open to the public. Of this prosperous tribe, Swentzell was born into a family of potters and sculptors; the young artist grew up around clay objects and would make objects for fun. During her early school years, where she more and more delved into her clay, Roxanne found her ability to communicate with others would become increasingly difficult as she had developed a speech impediment....   [tags: Native Americans in the United States]

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The Rituals Of Native Americans

- The syncretism and hybridity of religion represents the fluidity and ease in which religion can adapt to change over time, setting, and location. In the case of Native Americans, the syncretism and hybridity is rather a means to assert agency as well as an opportunity to preserve Native American religion in the face of European forced religious imperialism. An integral part of many Native American rituals, peyote is a small, spineless cactus is often seen as an important medicine in communities which practice peyote worship....   [tags: Religion, Native Americans in the United States]

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Use of Native American Mascots is NOT Racist

- Issue of whether to keep Mascots in schools or not, started in late 1970’s and from then this debate is going on. Most of the schools have Indian Mascots in place for half a century and suddenly it become problem to use Indian Mascots. Over 500 Native American organizations also announced their support for the removal of those mascots and over 1200 schools across the United States have changed the name of their sports teams and some school refused to play with those schools using Indian mascots....   [tags: Native American Mascots Essays]

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The Native American Experience: Through The Eyes of Poetry

- Code “What I’m about to tell you, Corporal, cannot leave this room. Under no circumstances can you allow your code talker to fall into enemy hands. Your mission is to protect the code… at all cost.” In the movie, Windtalkers, this is how a commander wants his marine to treat the paired Navajo code talker. That is, if it’s necessary, his marine could kill the Navajo, just like abandoning one of his properties. Even in the mid 1900s, the Native Americans were still treated not as human beings, but rather, machines; therefore, it is not hard for us to imagine how even more frightening the Native Americans’ circumstances were in the early days when they were first colonized by the western sett...   [tags: Native Americans Literature]

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Native American Voices Know the Definition of Native American

- Many school children celebrate a cliché Thanksgiving tradition in class where they play Indians and Pilgrims, and some children engage in the play of Cowboys vs. Indians. It is known that some died when colonization occurred, that some fought the United States government, and that they can be boiled down to just another school mascot. This is what many people understand of the original inhabitants of America. Historical knowledge of these people has been shallow and stereotyped. The past 150 years has given birth to a literate people now able to record their past, present, and future....   [tags: American History, Oral Tradition]

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Culture Conflicts: Native Americans versus The White Man

- People had already been living in America long before the white man ever “discovered” it. These people were known as the Native Americans. Most of them had lived peacefully on the land, for hundreds of years until the early 1800s when white settlers began their move west. As these white settlers came upon the Native Americans, they brought with them unwavering beliefs that would end up causing great conflicts with the Native people, who had their own set of values. It was clear that the white man and the Native Americans could not live among each other peacefully for their values and culture were much too different....   [tags: native americans, land, conflicts]

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Native American Folklore As Mythology

- Throughout history, and all over the world, mythology has been developed as a way of explaining the unknown and coping with one’s existence. Why does the sun shine. Well, seemingly, to generations past, something is controlling the universe, so there must be a god in charge of the sun and many other natural phenomenon. During the creation of Native American myths, “there was much in the way of free-range food, but hunting wasn't as easy as getting up in the morning, taking a stroll and shooting a few passing bison with your bow” (Godchecker)....   [tags: us history, american history]

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The Native American Experience as Portrayed Through the Essay Titled, Address, and the Painting Titled, Among the Sierra Nevada

- The Native Land Imagine living in a place where you feel free, and safe all of your life, and then one day it’s all taken away from you. Native Americans have always depended on the land to take care of them. Had the Great Spirit forsaken them. These are the thoughts that pondered the mind of Seattle as he answered to the Governor of Washington, in the essay titled “Address”. What was the purpose or message behind Albert Bierstadt’s painting titled “Among the Sierra Nevada”. How are these two separate works associated....   [tags: native american indians, american history, art]

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Native American Poetry: Joy Jarjo

- Joy Harjo is a Native American poet who uses her heritage as an influence in her writing. She also uses her Native American background to bring awareness to the adversities that they encounter in the society, especially from a feminist point of view. The poem, written in the style of a Native American chant, “She Had Some Horses” gives a voice to a voiceless woman which gives her the opportunity to tell her story and provides her with a sense of worth. In the poem “She Had Some Horses” we can identify various themes throughout the poem that show the influence of her Native American culture and feminist views in her writing....   [tags: society, adversities, culture, stanza]

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Should The Federal Government Give Native American Nations Sovereignty Over Their Natural Resources?

- Should the Federal Government give Native American Nations sovereignty over their natural resources. In the United States there has always been a wealth inequality endured by minorities but no community has suffered greater than those who have inhabited these lands originally. Native Americans remain critically disadvantaged because of the lingering effects of colonization and the reservations that were established to allow for tribal nationhood have been described as having living conditions that are normally seen in the third world....   [tags: Native Americans in the United States]

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Native American and The US government

- Native American and The US government The Iroquois Nation was a nation of five tribes, which was comprised of Mohawks, Senecas, Oneidas, Cayugas, and Onondagas. These tribes were originally separated, but later brought together by two Indians named Hiawatha and Deganawidah. Hiawatha seemed to be the spokesman while Deganawidah took on the role as a philosopher. These two men formed a nation where some of the ideas are still intact today. One aspect that made them so strong was the way in which they governed themselves....   [tags: essays papers]

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The Domestic Manifestation Of American Imperialism

- Although imperialism is thought of as an international political practice, such a characterization of imperialism neglects the significance of domestic events in imperial ambitions. Cultural historian Robert Rydell postulated that the 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition ushered in an era of American political and social imperial policy. The organizers of the 1893 Exposition, Rydell argued, created conflicting exhibitions to highlight the technological achievements of white civilization, but in contrast, featured non-White, specifically Native Americans, as barbarous and incapable of civility....   [tags: Native Americans in the United States]

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Alternative Representations Of The American Wilderness

- ... It appears that this sky woman, an Iroquois ancestor or deity, constantly looks over the Iroquois, causing them to regard the wilderness as holy. Since their ancestors watched over the wilderness, the Natives thought that nature was their refuge. They believed that they would always find protection and enlightenment within the wilderness since the spirits would shelter them and lead them in the right direction. To the Natives, they did not just live among nature, but instead, were a part of it....   [tags: Native Americans in the United States]

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The History of Native Americans

- Native American were the first to inhabit the country America.They lived about 40,000 years ago.Native American has a rich history.Native American lived in many tribe.They were very religious.They fought in many battles.Native American had a history in which they struggle, strife, and triumph. Native American lived in tribes.In which they built cities. They got food by hunting and fishing. Some tribes had a forms of trade, and money was used.Native American lived in Hogan, Teepee, longhouse, and cedar plank house.The men were hunters, warriors, and protectors, while the women tended to the children, their homes, and farmed....   [tags: culture, religion, tribes]

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Native American Sound Instruments

- "Native American Sound Instruments" Through my own personal experiences and teachings from Native Americans, that have offered to enlighten me, I've gathered that there is a sacred nature rich in spirit and soul to them. The Native American lives religion as a way of life. Children of the tribe grow up in this world of spirituality and learn from example that religion can come as easily as taking a breath every day. This is no attempt to lead into the topic of religion, yet it needs to be known that the Native American sound instruments are used as a part of that religion or spirituality....   [tags: essays research papers]

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The Native American

- ... It is used to communicate with the spirit world and is also used as a medicine. Native American religions and Christianity are far from the same. Even though they do consist of many great differences there are some similarities. Both believe in one creator although the name of that creator is different between the two. The Natives call this creator “Master Spirit” where the Christians call it God. The two also believe in an after life. The Natives though believe that the afterlife is becoming a spirit of the animal....   [tags: religion, church, life ]

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Ancient Native American Traditions

- Ancient Native American Traditions The novel "Reservation Blues" does not describe or deal with real Indians. The real Native Americans were forever destroyed by the government the second that they set foot upon the makeshift reservation. That very second saw the perish of all the age-long values and traditions that, before that moment, defined, raised, and watched over every Indian boy and girl, every Indian husband and wife, and every Indian father and mother. The U.S. government easily and nonviolently accomplished what the army has been struggling to do for many years, it wiped out a whole race of people, turning them into a mindless horde that was of concern to no one....   [tags: History culture Indians Essays]

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Native Americans in Poverty a Losing Battle: The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexie

- ... This creates an infinite circle of impoverishment. The main character of the novel, Junior, makes the hardships of being in poverty clear in this statement: “It sucks to be poor, and it sucks to feel that you some- how deserve to be poor. You start believing that you’re poor because you’re stupid and ugly. And then you start believ- ing that you’re stupid and ugly and because you’re Indian. And because you’re Indian you start believing you’re destined to be poor. Its an ugly circle and there’s nothing you can do about it.”(Alexie 13) Junior states that there is nothing that anyone can do about being in poverty, believing that there is no way to change one’s future....   [tags: no escape, native americans]

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Cultural Identity in Native Speaker by Chang-Rae Lee

- When asked to define ones cultural identity people usually take the path that leads to their country of origin. They describe their beliefs and tradition which mirrors the values of people within that geographic location. But what about the people who are torn between two cultures. How would they define their cultural identity. This is the problem faced by Henry Park, the protagonist of the book Native Speaker by Chang-Rae Lee. Originally from Korea, he immigrated to the United States with his parents when he was little....   [tags: Native Speaker Essays]

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The Relationship between the Environment and Humans as Shown by the Native Americans and the English Settlers

- The relationship held between the environment and humans is sacred and ever-changing. Both the Native Americans and the English settlers used the land to their advantage, but they had different goals in mind. The English Settlers were more interested in creating civilizations and killing animals so they could make a profit. Native Americans were more interested in using the land and the animals that they killed in an efficient manner. Native Americans were natural born warriors, they were not schooled and they suffered from a lack of farming abilities, but their capability to adapt to their surroundings was unmatched and gave them a greater appreciation for the land they lived on....   [tags: Environment, Humans, Environmentalism, Native Amer]

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Native American Remedies

- Native American Remedies "Mike Spring, paralyzed from the waist... down and in constant pain, sailed to the Azores and back. On his return, he confounded his TV interviewer with the statement that the only way he was able to obtain relief from the pain that continually racked his body was to press his back to an oak tree. This simple and cost-free action would then afford him several hours of complete relief and helped him to carry on in life. When asked for a scientific explanation, Mr. Spring replied that he had none-- it simply worked....   [tags: Medicine Culture Papers]

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The, Klan Hood, And The Native American

- The noose, Klan hood, and the Native American headdress represent how America mistreats other people. The noose and the Klan hood show that America is a place that discriminates against black people in its own society. Even though the Nazi party murdered millions of people in cold blood, they still saw our racism as a point they could use to persuade their citizens that we are evil. The Native American headdress has the same metaphor but for the Native American people. Our ancestors killing the Native Americans is another example of how we are malicious....   [tags: United States, World War II]

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A Brief History of American Imperialism

- The United States saw its territory more than double in the first three decades of the 19th century. Bursting with nationalist fervor, an insatiable desire for more land, and a rapidly increasing population, the western frontiers of the United States would not remain east of the Mississippi. The eventual spread of the American nation beyond the Mississippi into Native and French land, referred to as “Manifest Destiny” by John O’Sullivan, was rationalized as a realization of their God given duty....   [tags: Native American genocide]

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History of Native American Literature

- The normal life of Native Americans in early America was pretty low key. They were the only people in Northern America until the end of the 15th century. Soon after, in the 16th and 17th centuries, many people from Europe traveled to America. This caused many problems for the American Indians. The European diseases and weapons caused many deaths among the Native Americans. They were abused by the newcomers who stole their land and treated them badly. There were wars between Indian tribes that caused injury and death....   [tags: story telling, tribes, spiritual]

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A Marxist Reading of Native Son

- A Marxist Reading of Native Son In the Communist Manifesto Karl Marx states clearly that history is a series of class struggles over the means of production. Whoever controls the means of production also controls society and is able to force their set of ideas and beliefs onto the lower class. The present dominant class ideology is, as it has been since the writing of the United States Constitution, the ideology of the upper-class, Anglo-Saxon male. Obviously, when the framers spoke of equality for all, they meant for all land-owning white men....   [tags: Native Son Essays]

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Hispanic and Native Americans Culture in California

- Upon initial research of the rich heritage of California the two minority groups that stood out as especially influential in historic California and today’s society are the Native Americans and Hispanic Americans. To better understand and identify with these minority groups we must identify the common themes within their day to day life. By researching each culture’s common family traditions, religious beliefs, arts & entertainment, and language one can gain a greater appreciation of many different kinds of people, and in turn have more effective relationships in a multicultural society....   [tags: Culture ]

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Christianization among Native Americans

- Wrong actions can affect your surroundings negatively, and can clearly have profound effects on people, animals, or nature. One of the examples that have led to the destruction of culture and nature is colonization. Colonization is the mistreatment of a weak country by a powerful country, moving their people into the territory of interest, and exercising power to rule over the people, and the land. Some of the colonization that took place ended up eradicating people’s spiritual and religious beliefs and replacing it with theirs....   [tags: American History]

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2259 words | (6.5 pages) | Preview

The European Impact on Native American Technology

- The European Impact on Native American Technology When European exploration led to the populating of the Americas, it was described as the event with one of the greatest ecological impacts in history. The force behind this impact was the mass movement of people and their behavior's toward their "New World". It only stands to reason that a clash would occur with the natives of these lands. One of the areas with the greatest conflict was the field of technology. Scientifically, when the cultures of 15th century Europe and the natives in the Americas are concerned, the two are fairly alike....   [tags: American America History]

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1654 words | (4.7 pages) | Preview

Native American Stereotype Representation

- Native American Stereotype Representation Stereotyping may be historical, but the emotions it arouses are eminently present today. According to Jack G. Shaheen, “Stereotypes are especially confining images. They are standardized mental picture[s] . . . representing oversimplified opinion[s] . . . that [are] staggeringly tenacious in [their] hold over rational thinking,” (303). It is obvious today that the presence of the Native American Indians is historically significant. Attitudes of those in the nineteenth century, who viewed images of American Indians, were shaped through the means of media....   [tags: traditional, image, savages]

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The West : The True Nature Of People

- The American Western era was a fascinating time in history. Though it is often associated with clashes between cowboys, duels, and ghost towns, this was not the entire reality. The west was a complex and important time in American history. The people and events would shape America into what it has become today. This era, while an important one, is too often exaggerated and falsified. The truth of this era, therefore is lost in translation. In Cather’s My Antonia several aspects of the west are explored, including the true nature of people, the cruelty of nature, and the frequent struggle to survive....   [tags: Native Americans in the United States]

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738 words | (2.1 pages) | Preview

African and Native American Influence in America

- The African American slave influence in the beginnings of American culture and technology and Native Americans of the North American Continent were significant in creating America. By revealing the different ways this achieved, we can see the work and techniques that drove the new country and how this created by the political, as well as ideological ramifications of their labors. With all of these contributions to the new country of the United States, we see that the formation of the world power built on the principles that the early settlers created in their work....   [tags: Social Studies]

Term Papers
1937 words | (5.5 pages) | Preview

The American Of American Indian Mascots

- ... Davis-Delano (2007) compared seven case studies in which Native American mascots were eliminated to seven in which they were not, and examined factors that contributed to their elimination/non-elimination. She found that mascot opponents are losing for following three causes: conservatism and worship of sport, more powerful mascot supporters, and irrational actions (Davis-Delano, 2007). To no surprise, people feel more inclined to their own beliefs and fandom than to be cognizant enough to realize the cynical nature of these controversial mascots....   [tags: Native Americans in the United States]

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1068 words | (3.1 pages) | Preview

On How the American Indians Were Removed from Their Land

- "One by one Indian peoples were removed to the West. The Delaware, the Ottawa, Shawnee, Pawnee and Potawatomi, the Sauk and Fox, Miami and Kickapoo, the Choctaw, Chickasaw, Creek and Seminole. In all some 90 thousand Indians were relocated. The Cherokee were among the last to go. Some reluctantly agreed to move. Others were driven from their homes at bayonet point. Almost two thousands of them died along the route they remembered as the Trail of Tears." For decades, the state of Georgia sought to enforce its authority over the Cherokee Nation, but its efforts had little effect until the election of President Andrew Jackson, a longtime supporter of Indian removal....   [tags: Native American history]

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1570 words | (4.5 pages) | Preview

Native American Education

- Children were taken away from their homes and told everything they knew was wrong. They were sent to boarding schools to change their culture. These boarding schools were run by the United States government. The government's goal was to civilize Native Americans. They sent children to these schools against their will. Native American children were educated like Americans and they had to change their native ways to be more like whites (Cayton 266). Teachers abused their students and beat their native ways out of them....   [tags: children, schooling, violation, rights, culture]

Term Papers
2260 words | (6.5 pages) | Preview

Native American Religions

- Over the century Native American religions have been repressed and misunderstood. There has been little room for them to actually be able to explain their rituals and why it is important to them as a society. This ignorance’s has resulted in the loss of land, false practices with sacred objects, and a lack of education within the rituals of indigenous religions. The indigenous population deserves support to preserve their practices and language. Since most of these religions have been repressed for so long many elders do not wish to teach their kin about their religion in fear of rejection from the modern society....   [tags: society, rituals, religious freedom]

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1152 words | (3.3 pages) | Preview

Sherman Alexie A Native American Writer

- Sherman Alexie has made a name for himself as a prolific contemporary Native American writer, taking inspiration from his own past and experiences with modern Indian life. While there are many enduring themes throughout Alexie's writings: Native identity, modern reservation life, alcohol abuse etc. when it comes to his collection War Dances, the most apparent motif is fatherhood. Community and family are the heart of Native American cultures, with the father archetype holding great honor and expectation....   [tags: fatherhood, war dances]

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1190 words | (3.4 pages) | Preview

Native American Tribes: The Choctaw Tribe

- Prior to the first European settlers stepping foot onto what is now the United States, Native American tribes flourished for hundreds of years. Each tribe was unique, yet all shared in the practice of living off of natural resources the land provided. Once European settlers discovered the Americas, the tails of the country’s native inhabitants spread across the seas. These early settlers began to trade with the natives and eventually named the “Five Civilized Tribes” (Choctaw Indian Facts). These tribes included the Cherokee, Chickasaw, Creek, Seminole, and Choctaw Indians....   [tags: Cherokee, Chickasaw, Creek, Seminole]

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990 words | (2.8 pages) | Preview

Holocaust vs. Native American Genocide

- The term genocide brings awful things to mind. For most, it probably directs their attention towards the Holocaust; this was definitely a gruesome and obvious example of genocide, but there are many others with great similarities that are not very well known. One of these is the decimation of the Native American population by the European settlers and the atrocious things that were done to them such as the trail of tears following the Indian Removal Act of 1830 during the settling of North America....   [tags: nazis, weapon, european settlers]

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945 words | (2.7 pages) | Preview

American Indians

- American Indians form one of the minorities groups in America. Yet their native soil has the leading population in the world. America was inclined by their viewpoint before the first settler. Many of the Indians came to America as early as the turn of the century, in which they were deprived of residency until a congressional act was approved in 1946(Lee 106). Most Indians have supplied abundant assistance to the culture and flawless being of US; majorities of these donations regulate to the science field....   [tags: Native Americans, American History]

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895 words | (2.6 pages) | Preview

African Americans, Asian Americans And Native Americans

- In the wake of one of the most destructive and devastating catastrophes ever to have occurred in this country, sparks of aggressive discussion over matters of class and race were reignited as news outlets released images of the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. An image from the Associated Press (AP) shows a young black man, wading through waist-high floodwaters, dragging a large floating bag of supplies after, as the caption indicates, “looting” a grocery store. A contrasting image from Agence France-Presse (AFP) shows a pair of Caucasian residents, a man and a woman, trudging through the same waters after “finding” a meager set of rations from a local store....   [tags: Asian American, White American, Race]

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2270 words | (6.5 pages) | Preview

The Crucial Role of Native Americans

- For the better part of American history, the Indians have been viewed and portrayed as dimwitted, helpless victims that aimlessly stood by while the Europeans conquered their land, but this view has recently come under fire and has been overturned, as it was determined to be misleading and inaccurate. Two historians that have questioned the legitimacy of past beliefs regarding the Indians are Charles Mann and James Axtell. Each has made it plainly clear in their articles that the actions of Indians should no longer be treated as useless footnotes on the pages of history....   [tags: Colonial America]

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756 words | (2.2 pages) | Preview

Native Americans- Minority Role

- Thesis Since the arrival of the Europeans in 1492 the Native American has systematically been dehumanized, decivilized and redefined into terms that typify a subordinate or minority role, restricted life opportunities persist today as a result. I. Introduction-Majority/Minority group relations- the role of power II. Historical Overview A. Native American life before contact with the White man. B. Early contact, efforts at peaceful co-existence. C. Conflict and its consequences for Native Americans III....   [tags: essays research papers fc]

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3436 words | (9.8 pages) | Preview

How American Indians Have Adapted their Culture Since Colonization

- My essay will have an outlook of the history of the first Americans “Indians” and how they’ve adapted with their religion, subsistence strategy, social organization, and material culture. Over the years things have change in the history of Native Americans, prior to the reconstruction period, Native Americans knew who they were and what they lived for. Before the Europeans came and changed their living they one with nature and the land they’ve came to know. They believe that America was there’s and they lived free....   [tags: American Indians, Native Americans, Colonies]

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964 words | (2.8 pages) | Preview

Native Peoples: Learning About The Extensive Native American Culture

- ... Furthermore, the magazine illustrates jewelry and clothing for women. Nevertheless, men can also find this magazine interesting to read not only because we see many art crafts and tourism but also because some might be interested in learning about the history. The articles that are found in Native Peoples Magazine are very diverse and amusing. For instance, the articles illustrate the colorful and extravagant paintings and potteries of the Native American culture. The pictures in the articles depict the lifestyles of Native Americans back in the days in comparison to today’s form of dressing....   [tags: design, magazine, history]

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694 words | (2 pages) | Preview

No One Hears Words on a Page: The Native American Oral Tradition

- The impact of contemporary Native American authors is not diminished by the fact they fail to fully transcribe tales of the oral tradition into an equally successful literary story. The basic elements of the oral tradition are technically adhered to but the interaction between audience and the teller is absent. The lack of personal interaction with the histories and ethical tales changes the culture of Native Americans. Literary stories are generally published for public consumption. The public, not sensitive to Native culture, then controls the success and future publication of the stories....   [tags: American Literature]

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1035 words | (3 pages) | Preview

The Role of Native American Women

- With Native Americans being the first inhabitants of North America, many people often question what traditions they have created on their own, before the ideas of the pale settlers. When taking a look into their interesting beliefs, it is obvious to see an intricate basis or animals and spirits that guide the lifestyles of Indians all over the country. Even their society had a special way of doing things, including gender roles of both men and women. There are many customs that have seemed odd to the average American throughout the centuries, but Indians found these a normal way of life....   [tags: essays research papers fc]

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1059 words | (3 pages) | Preview

The Struggle to Gain Equality: A Study of Native American Woman in Literature

- Respect Frees Women from Inequality In "Woman: Myth and Reality," Simone De Beauvoir describes the myth of the Eternal Feminine which creates inequality between men and women. In "The Four Idols," Francis Bacon uses the four idols of the tribe, the cave, the marketplace, and the theater to show how humans' understanding and intelligence hinders their knowledge of nature. In "The Origin of Civil Society," Jean-Jacques Rousseau concludes that the Social Contract benefits those who are not strong to fight for their equality in law and civil rights....   [tags: American Literature]

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1665 words | (4.8 pages) | Preview

The Culture and History of Native Americans

- Native American, or American Indians, have a rich culture comprised of struggle, strife and success. For this paper, i will discuss the Native American Culture and it's history. History Spotted Tail, Lakota Sioux Chief stated: "This war did not spring up on our land, this war was brought upon us by the children of the Great Father who came to take our land without a price, and who, in our land, do a great many evil things....This war has come from robbery from the stealing of our land. (Lazarus 1991)....   [tags: disease, unity, identity]

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779 words | (2.2 pages) | Preview

Stereotypical Images of Native Americans

- Stereotypical Images of Native Americans The encounter of Christopher Columbus with the indigenous people of the Americas and the Caribbean would ultimately set in motion the destruction of Native American life and culture as it had existed for thousands of years. Images and stereotypes of the Native Americans were indelibly etched into the minds of the Europeans and we struggle today to eradicate these harmful portrayals. When Columbus arrived in the Caribbean in 1492, he was greeted by the natives of what is currently Haiti and the Dominican Republic, on the island of Hispaniola....   [tags: American America History]

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2006 words | (5.7 pages) | Preview

The 1940 Disney Movie Pinocchio and Native American Literature

- Native American literature began before pen and paper, and before the Europeans came to North America. The Native Americans had already developed a rich history of their own using oral tradition to pass on their stories and myths. This was because the many tribes were so diverse, and at the time, they lacked an actual written language. The oral tradition was not only the telling of a story, but a performance to retell the story of many different themes and ideas. These ideas include a tribe's cultural background, historical events, but most Native American literature contains morals or being creation myths or folklore....   [tags: geppetto, childhood media, jiminy]

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1194 words | (3.4 pages) | Preview

Native American Healing And Dance

- Native American Dance and Healing Native Americans in Contemporary Society: The population in the United States has increased steadily in the 20th century. In 1990 the number of Native Americans was almost two million, 8 percent of the total population. Slightly more than one third live on a reservation; about half live in urban areas. Indian reservations function as independent governments within the federal framework. Among many of the Native Americans, there are many musical styles, singing is the dominant form of musical expression, with instrumental music serving primarily as rhythmic accompaniment....   [tags: essays research papers]

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789 words | (2.3 pages) | Preview

Spiritual Beliefs and Customs of Native American Tribes

- Many Native American tribes share different spiritual and cultural views on the aspect of life. Belief in God and the things he created depend on what tribe you belong to. Tribes like the Onondaga and the Modoc have several stories that inform us regarding their religious customs and beliefs. The origin myths were written to point out the beliefs among tribes. “The Earth on Turtle’s Back” and “When Grizzlies Walked Upright” provides us with examples of what the Onondaga and Modoc tribes believed in....   [tags: life, belief, customs, teach]

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529 words | (1.5 pages) | Preview

Pocahontas: An Influentlial Native American in the 1600's

- Pocahontas was an influential Native American in the 1600s. Born in 1595 near Jamestown, she was her father’s favorite daughter. Her father was Native American chief Powhatan, and he had several other children. Pocahontas is most known for what she did to help the English settlers in her area. She is believed to have saved a settler named John Smith’s life entirely. She then went on to marry John Rolfe and move to England with him shortly before her death in 1617. The tribe that Pocahontas belonged to, the Powhatans, were indeed religious....   [tags: Captain John Smith, Powhatans]

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1379 words | (3.9 pages) | Preview

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