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The Importance of Being Earnest, by Oscar Wilde

- In The Importance of Being Earnest Oscar Wilde revealed that animalistic traits can tint a character’s intellectual attributes. All of the characters possess an overwhelming desire which seems to diminish their morality. Wilde uses Jack Worthing’s animalistic behaviors to reveal that his animal self is damaging his intellectual self. The play is presented to show that the characters retain an exaggerated pleasure with food, which shows their pleasures in inanimate objects. Every character in the play is drawn into lustful relationships, thus mutilating their psychological self....   [tags: the importance of being earnest, oscar wilde]

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Exploring Male and Female Expectations in Oscar Wilde's Play

- The primary theme of this play is love and marriage and Wilde explores the male and female role expectations, beliefs and ideals of domestic relationships of the upper class British society in the late 1890’s. The social norms of the Victorian era had strict rules for the behaviours of men and women. For women, who were legally their husband’s property until 1884, high standards were expected. They were to run a respectable household, delegate servants, be quite, compassionate, ladylike and virtuous....   [tags: Oscar Wilde, theatre, ]

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Oscar Wilde 's An Ideal Husband

- A very intelligent novelist, Oscar Wilde, catches his reader’s attention in his satirical play, An Ideal Husband, through a humorous drama filled political scandal and blackmail. Wilde sucks his audience into the romantic comedy by placing the reader with the characters throughout all their battles—in which he points out their bad habits and their faults. Wilde accomplishes drawing readers in by creating the satirical message of his play through satirical elements such as exaggeration, sarcasm, and irony....   [tags: Irony, Sarcasm, Oscar Wilde, An Ideal Husband]

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Oscar Wilde 's Life And Writing Career

- ... Lord Henry learning about the astonishing Dorian Gray found an interest in meeting him. While Lord Henry was at Basil’s house, Dorian showed up. Hesitantly, Basil introduced Lord Henry Wotton to Dorian. Basil didn’t want to introduce him to Lord Henry because he’s afraid of the influence Lord Henry might put on Dorian. When he finally had the opportunity to meet Dorian he showed himself to be very intriguing. While Basil gave Dorian a break, Dorian and Lord Henry wondered to the garden and Lord Henry gave Dorian a speech on how the beauties that he holds now will soon age....   [tags: Oscar Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray]

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Oscar Wilde 's The Picture Of Dorian Gray

- In Oscar Wilde’s novel, The Picture of Dorian Gray, the character Basil Hallward is enamored with Dorian Gray’s youth and innocence. This love for Dorian is an example of Greek love or boy love that would have been popular during the late Victorian age, especially with the decadence. However, this love would have been frowned upon and in the case of Wilde, legally held against him. In the first chapter of the novel, Basil and Harry began speaking about Dorian. Basil tells Harry of his feelings toward Dorian: The merely visible presence of this lad—for he seems to me little more than a lad, though he is really over twenty—his merely visible presence—ah....   [tags: Oscar Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray]

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The Ballad Of Reading Gaol By Oscar Wilde And The Great Hunger

- ... Wilde makes use of repetition with internal refrain. He does this because he wants to reinforce his ideas at set the gloomy atmosphere of the poem. I never saw a man who looked With such a wistful eye Upon that little tent of blue Which prisons call the sky, (13-16) He ended each stanza that contained this refrain with two more lines that were different each time. This highly structured but gloomily writing pattern resembled that life in a prison. Justice is a hidden theme in “The Ballad of Reading Gaol.” Some would argue that it was Wilde’s central reason for writing the poem in the first place....   [tags: Poetry, Rhyme, Oscar Wilde, Prison]

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Oscar Wilde 's The Picture Of Dorian Gray

- Oscar Wilde liked to be right. Wait—no, no, that’s not right. Let’s try that again. Oscar Wilde liked people to think he was right. He had the uncanny ability of saying something that sounded good and then doing the exact opposite. Some would call that hypocrisy, but the more popular term for it seems to be “genius” judging by his status as a renowned writer and still-popular celebrity. Genius or not, Wilde knew how to put together a sentence. His life was one for the books, and his book, The Picture of Dorian Gray, is one ripe for the analysis....   [tags: Oscar Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray]

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The Nature Of Oscar Wilde 's The Picture Of Dorian Gray

- The Wilderness of Wilde Oscar Wilde’s The Picture of Dorian Gray introduced cultural taboo, the means of art and beauty, and the internal pain of man into the literary world of the 19th century. Wilde himself went through these phases of life and wanted to push views of his reality onto his audience. He portrays several characters through the means of moral corruption over aestheticism while pushing his own controversial ideas and the limits of social normality, such as living indefinitely and homosexuality, over the audience of his era....   [tags: Oscar Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray]

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Oscar Wilde's Young King

- Oscar Wilde's 'The Young King' is the tale of a young man's metamorphosis, through a dream quest, that opens his eyes to the heart rendering struggle of the poor, who are exploited by the rich and the powerful to satisfy their own selfish needs. The change that takes place in the Young King reflects his attainment of the virtue asked for in Christ's message. The story begins with "the night before the day fixed for his coronation" and the young king, "being but sixteen years of age" sits alone in his opulent chambers adorned with rich and beautiful things....   [tags: Oscar Wilde]

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Oscar Wilde 's The Picture Of Dorian Gray

- Oscar Wilde’s The Picture of Dorian Gray (1890) follows the story of Dorian Gray; a man gifted with exquisite natural beauty, whose vanity and obsession with his own youth leads him astray in a life of sin. As Dorian slowly loses his innocence, with the obsession of living hedonistically, his portrait suffers the punishment for his sins and growing age. Dorian himself remains untouched in age; however, the portrait reflects the loss of innocence in his pursuit of atheistic and hedonistic lifestyle....   [tags: The Picture of Dorian Gray, Oscar Wilde]

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Analysis Of Oscar Wilde 's ' Dorian Gray '

- ... One day, when drinking from the river, he notices his reflection and is completely captivated by it, not realizing that it is himself. Narcissus vows to wait for the beautiful person to come out, and he waits by the river until he dies (Myth of Narcissus). Like most myths, the creator is unknown, but they had the same perception of humanity as Oscar Wilde. It is apparent that the novel is loosely based on the myth because of the number of parallels in the stories. Dorian, like Narcissus, has heard how nice he looks from others all his life, but is unaware of the extent of his beauty until presented with an image of himself....   [tags: The Picture of Dorian Gray, Oscar Wilde]

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Oscar Wilde 's The Picture Of Dorian Gray

- ... It is interesting how Dorian Gray realizes he has been corrupted by the book that he read, not by the painting that has been ruining his life. If Dorian Gray can pin point the cause of his corrupted soul to a book he read over 20 years ago, the book must have had an immeasurable impact on his life. The painting haunts him day after day and every single bad event in his life seems to have a some relation of sorts to his hideous portrait, yet he has determined that the hideous portrait is not the cause of his immorality....   [tags: The Picture of Dorian Gray, Oscar Wilde]

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Analysis Of Oscar Wilde 's ' The Picture Of Dorian Gray '

- Prompt #1 - The many faces of a portrait In Oscar Wilde’s ‘The Picture Of Dorian Gray’, the portrait shapes Dorian’s life by manipulating his behavior and perceptions in a negative way. Throughout the novel Dorian aspires to be superior to the painting because of the many sins that are reflected through it. The portrait becomes more hideous because Dorian is extremely corrupted with looks and sex. Between Lord Henry and the painting Dorian truly becomes a monster. Dorian takes in the superficial ideas of life, hoping to reinvent himself, and become a completely different person....   [tags: The Picture of Dorian Gray, Oscar Wilde]

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Purpose of "The Picture of Dorian Gray" by Oscar Wilde

- The book, The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde is one that has many purposes in it. One purpose in the book shows how individuals can slowly deteriorate because of the evil lying within themselves. The major purpose of this novel is how much power art has over others. When an artist composes a great piece of work, he puts his heart into it. Part of that person is invested into it’s creation, which makes it more than just a statue in a museum, or a picture on the wall. In the novel, more than the artist’s heart is put into his painting....   [tags: Picture of Dorian Gray, Oscar Wilde, ]

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Oscar Wilde 's The Picture Of Dorian Gray

- ... Dorian’s Ordeal is next. When Sibyl died, he thought that it is only because he is a human and he should not be guilty of it. Lord Henry told him that Sibyl is just a woman. He lacked conscience. But as his sins grows worse, his face in the painting which Basil for him becomes uglier and uglier. Dorian uses the portrait as an escape. Next is when he killed Basil and James. When he killed James, it’s because whenever he see James, it makes him feel guilty of the death of Sibyl. And when he killed Basil because Basil knows his secrets and he blames Basil for the painting and how he ages in the painting....   [tags: Oscar Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray]

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The Laughter and Plodding of the Film Adaption of Oscar Wilde’s "The Importance of Being Earnest"

- Whenever Jack Worthing (Firth) wants to leave his boring country life behind, he travels to London pretending to be his fictitious ‘brother’ Earnest. In the city he falls in love with the beautiful Gwendolen (O’Connor). There are two things standing in the way of their true love: first there is Gwendolen's Mother (Dench), a matriarchal woman whom all potential suitors must pass. Secondly, Gwendolen believes that she could only ever love a man named Earnest: which is the name by which she knows Jack....   [tags: Oscar Wilde, plays, ]

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Oscar Wilde's An Ideal Husband

- Oscar Wilde's An Ideal Husband Oscar Wilde (1845-1903) lived an outrageous and controversial life which was well publicized and condemned, as his life defied the strict social mores of the time. He was put into this public position due to the success of his plays which challenged Victorian earnestness while being hilariously funny. His plays, in particular An Ideal Husband, 1895 portray Victorian society as viciously hypocritical at it's worst and laughably pretentious at it's best....   [tags: Oscar Wilde Papers]

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Analysis Of Oscar Wilde 's ' Picture Of Dorian Gray '

- ... When you arrive in a new setting that you’re not used to you sort of just join the crowd and attempt to fit in. Dorian’s at the age where he is easily influenced by anything anyone says, especially if they are older because “the older you get, the more wise you become”. The closer that Dorian and Lord Henry got, the more Dorian felt that he could trust Lord Henry. Lord Henry resembles the little demon on the side of your shoulder that whispers all the bad thoughts in your head. He’s the puppet master for Dorian because he toys Dorian into believing whatever he says....   [tags: The Picture of Dorian Gray, Oscar Wilde, Love]

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Satire in “The Importance of Being Earnest” by Oscar Wilde

- A satire is a piece of work that is designed to ridicule or tease a group or organization, generally for the purpose of being humorous. “The Importance of Being Earnest,” a play by Oscar Wilde, is a satire, ridiculing class, gender, and marriage. This essay will describe some points from each of these sections, as well as give a brief synopsis of the play these examples come from. The Importance of being Earnest includes three acts, with seven major characters. In act one, we start with a conversation between Jack (a notable bachelor) and Algernon (an in debt bachelor, with a laid back temperament), in which we learn both have made up 'friends,' who are often sick, as to escape from whereve...   [tags: Satire, Importance of Being Earnest, Oscar Wilde, ]

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Salome by Oscar Wilde

- Salome by Oscar Wilde Oscar Wilde’s gruesome and controversial play begs and important question. Who is Salome. In the bible this woman is not even given a name. She is the daughter of Herodias who dances for the pleasure of her stepfather, Herod. Perhaps the very fact that she remains unnamed is part of the mystery and problem that is Salome. There was no need to name this type of woman in patriarchal Christian religion. Yet, Salome’s story continues to inspire and terrify both her champions and her harshest critics....   [tags: Salome Oscar Wilde Essays]

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Oscar Wilde's The Importance Of Being Earnest

- Oscar Wilde's The Importance Of Being Earnest Oscar Wilde is a legendary author who has composed many great plays including The Green Carnation and A Woman of No Importance, however, The Importance of Being Earnest was undoubtedly the most famous of his works. First published in 1930, yet acknowledged since the late 1800s, The Importance of Being Earnest helped to revive the theater tradition of Congreve and Sheridan. The story is a comedic view of romance and the emphasis we place on seemingly trivial articles, such as a name....   [tags: Oscar Wilde Earnest Essays]

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Oscar Wilde Art

- Oscar Wilde Art We begin another chapter in the life of Oscar Wilde, the year 1888, many things have taken place, Oscar has been married and bore two children, Vyvyan and Cyril and his touring of the United States and other countries have brought forth success to the literary giant. Some of his successful writings are "The Picture of Dorian Gray"(1891), "A Woman of No Importance"(1894) and his most resent essay known "The Decay of Lying". Is it true that lying has fallen to its deepest shadow of shame....   [tags: Oscar Wilde Writer Papers]

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The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde

- The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde Art. It's Beauty is in the eye of the beholder. Art can be so beautiful or so hideous. So monotonous or poignant. So imaginative or clichéd. So………right or wrong. Art really has no moral, does it. Although the book, The Picture of Dorian Gray has no ethical stance, it was not Oscar Wilde's intention to have a moral. It was to show the splendor of art for art's sake. Through out the paperback of The Picture of Dorian Gray, Oscar Wilde, wildly shows his beliefs in art for art's sake (Cauti XIV)....   [tags: Dorian Gray Oscar Wilde Analysis]

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Oscar Wilde's The Importance of Being Earnest

- Oscar Wilde's "The Importance of Being Earnest" In the closing lines of the first act of Oscar Wilde's "The Importance of Being Earnest," Algernon remarks, "I love scrapes. They are the only things that are never serious," to which Jack responds, "Oh, that's nonsense Algy. You never talk about anything but nonsense." Algernon caps off this exchange with a proclamation of the purpose of the whole work: "Nobody ever does" (1642). Wilde never allows anything in the work to conclude on a serious note....   [tags: Oscar Wilde Importance Earnest Essays]

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Modern Society As A Reflection Of The Picture Of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde

- Traditional gothic fiction was at the height of its popularity during the Victorian era, it exploded in the 1790’s and continued its reign well into the 1800’s. This confrontational style of fiction often blurs the lines of realistic and artificial, forcing readers to challenge their beliefs and surpass the norm. However, the aspect of gothic fiction that was most attractive to the Victorian audience was the way human fears and societal tensions were reflected in the deliberately fictionalised literary works....   [tags: Oscar Wilde]

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Oscar Wilde and His Fairy Tales

- Oscar Wilde and His Fairy Tales I. Introduction Wilde, Oscar (Fingal O’Flahertie Wills) (b. Oct. 16, 1854, Dublin, Ire ?d. Nov. 30, 1900, Paris, Fr.) Irish wit, poet and dramatist whose reputation rests on his comic masterpieces Lady Windermere’s Fan (1893) and The Importance of Being Earnest (1899). He was a spokesman for Aestheticism, the late19th-century movement in England that advocated art for art’s sake. However, Oscar Wilde’s takeoff of his enterprise and, his shaping of his characteristic style of works could be both considered originating from his fairy tales....   [tags: Oscar Wilde Fairy Tales Literature Essays]

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Oscar Wilde's The Importance of Being Earnest

- Oscar Wilde's The Importance of Being Earnest Webster’s dictionary defines earnest as “characterized by or proceeding from an intense and serious state of mind.” This definition is subject to total upheaval by Oscar Wilde in The Importance of Being Earnest. The title suggests a treatise on the value of solemnity in everyday life. However, Wilde presents us with an ironic play that leaves us with the opposite lesson. None of the characters benefit from propriety. The least serious characters, Algernon and Jack are rewarded in the end for their frivolous behavior throughout the play, implying that there is very little, if any, importance to being earnest, excepting that you give the appearan...   [tags: Oscar Wilde Importance Being Earnest Essays]

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The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde

- The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde “Like the painting of a sorrow, A face without a heart.” - Hamlet When I went to the movies, I didn’t expect to be so intrigued by the characters that I would want to read about them individually. “The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen” had many interesting characters: Mena the vampire, Alan Quartermain the hunter, Skinner the invisible man, Nemo the pirate, Dr. Jekyll the scientist, Tom Sawyer of the CIA, and Dorian Gray the immortal....   [tags: Picture Dorian Gray Oscar Wilde Essays]

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The Double Life in The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde

- The Double Life in The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde The Importance of Being Earnest appears to be a conventional 19th century farce. False identities, prohibited engagements, domineering mothers, lost children are typical of almost every farce. However, this is only on the surface in Wilde's play. His parody works at two levels- on the one hand he ridicules the manners of the high society and on the other he satirises the human condition in general. The characters in The Importance of Being Earnest assume false identities in order to achieve their goals but do not interfere with the others' lives....   [tags: Oscar Wilde Being Earnest Essays]

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Satire in Oscar Wilde's The Importance of Being Earnest

- Satire in Oscar Wilde's The Importance of Being Earnest The Importance of Being Earnest is a comedy of manners, whereby Oscar Wilde uses satire to ridicule marriage, love and the mentality of the Victorian aristocratic society. It can also be referred to as a satiric comedy. What is a satire and what is Oscar Wilde trying to emphasize by employing it in his play. A satiric comedy ridicules political policies or attacks deviations from social order by making ridiculous, the violators of its standards of morals or manners....   [tags: The Importance of Being Earnest Oscar Wilde]

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Manipulation in Oscar Wilde's The Picture of Dorian Gray

- Manipulation in Oscar Wilde's The Picture of Dorian Gray       "I do not think that one person influences another, nor do I think there is any bad influence in the world," Oscar Wilde uttered when under trial (Hyde 353). Although this statement may be true, one of Wilde's most famous works shows a great deal of the effects of people shaping one another, causing one to wonder about Wilde's sincerity in that statement. The Picture of Dorian Gray shows variations on the existence and purposes of influence, displaying two types of personal influence: obvious manipulations such as that of Lord Henry upon Dorian and that of Dorian over Sybil Vane, and those that are more often overlooked such...   [tags: Picture Dorian Gray Essays Oscar Wilde]

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General Structure of Comedy and the Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde

- General Structure of Comedy and the Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde GeneralStructure of Comedy: * Things start out badly and end well * The deeper aim is broadly social: the kingdom or other city space is at first badly ruled or in turmoil for some reason--perhaps the values and institutions of the citizens and/or rulers are in need of some re-examination. * Next, the main characters leave (willingly or otherwise) the city setting and wind up in the countryside, in a pastoral setting....   [tags: Oscar Wilde Earnest Comedy Essays]

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The Perversion of Dorian's Soul in Oscar Wilde's The Picture of Dorian Gray

- The Perversion of Dorian's Soul in Oscar Wilde's The Picture of Dorian Gray         The soul is thought to be an immaterial entity coexisting with our bodies which is credited with the faculties of thought, action, and emotion.  It is the part of our body which is believed to live on after the body dies.  In Oscar Wilde's, The Picture of Dorian Gray, the main character, Dorian Gray, destroys the innocence of his soul and becomes corrupt. He becomes corrupt by failing to live a life of virtue.  The main reason for his transformation can be attributed to a portrait painted of him that captured the true essence of his innocence.  This portrait is the personification of his soul.  At the be...   [tags: Oscar Wilde The Picture of Dorian Gray]

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Homosexual Elements in The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde

- Homosexual Elements in The Picture of Dorian Gray       In spite of the novel's heterosexual text, many critics agree that it has various homosexual elements in its characters, in the dialogues, and even in the portrait itself. One of the critics, Richard Dellamora, mentions this feature of the text, and comments that "By definition this context is heterosexual. Wotton is married and pursues actresses. Basil himself is a graduate of Oxford, a well-established artist, and respectable to a fault" (28)....   [tags: The Picture of Dorian Gray Oscar Wilde]

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Timeless Message of Equality in Oscar Wilde's The Importance of Being Earnest

- Timeless Message of Equality in Oscar Wilde's The Importance of Being Earnest   Oscar Wilde's The Importance of Being Earnest satirizes Victorian society.  The witty epigrams of his characters provide light comedy masking the underlying theme of criticism of the Victorian way of life.  Wilde's effective use of humour diffuses the tense theme of his work.  In a Victorian society that emphasized progress, it was precarious for artists like Oscar Wilde to express an imperfect interpretation of life in nineteenth-century England.  Wilde's attack on the ethics of his era is an attempt to fulfill the author's prophecy that art has the power to dictate life, not merely imitate it (614-615).  At...   [tags: Importance Being Earnest Oscar Wilde Essays]

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How Art Relates to Oscar Wilde's The Picture of Dorian Gray

- How Art Relates to Oscar Wilde's The Picture of Dorian Gray Oscar Wilde's The Picture of Dorian Gray is a novel about a young, handsome, and vain man who has his portrait painted, and impulsively wishes that he could forever remain just as handsome as he is in the painting -- that the painting would age instead of him. He gets his wish in a most eerie way; as, with passing years, he becomes increasingly dissolute and evil, while the changes that one would expect to appear on his face are reflected in the portrait instead....   [tags: Oscar Wilde Picture Dorian Gray Essays]

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The Life and Writings of Oscar Wilde

- Oscar Wilde is famous for many aspects of his life, including his childhood and adolescence, his marriage and dedication as a father, his homosexual encounters and imprisonment and for his fantastic skill to bewilder his audience. Wilde was a flamboyant nineteenth century writer known for his ability to create brilliant plays, imaginative and moral stories, and overall his incredible talent as a master in all forms of literature. Oscar Wilde was born in Dublin, Ireland on October 16, 1854. His full name at birth was Oscar Fingal O’Flahertie Wilde (Small vii)....   [tags: Biography ]

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Aestheticism in the Writing of Oscar Wilde

- First published as pop-culture in Lippincott's Magazine, Oscar Wilde's The Picture of Dorian Gray sparked immediate controversy with its Victorian critics (Introduction xvi-xviii). The Victorian Era, named so for the reign of British Queen Victoria, was tantamount to exacting moral principles – media, households and government were consumed by pious platitudes. During this time, anything suggestive of sex – literal or allegorical – was stringently suppressed; women were to be covered up to the chin, out to the hands, and down to the ankles, likewise, piano and table legs were covered to the floor....   [tags: Literary Themes]

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The Homosexual Legacy of Oscar Wilde

- On October 16, 1854, the eccentric and fervently revered Oscar Fingal O’Flahertie Wills Wilde was born in Dublin, Ireland. Wilde’s work as a dramatist, novelist, and poet was marked by controversial wit, and was often the subject of moral outrage in Europe. Much of his writing reflected his own life and his protest against societal norms happening during the nineteenth century. His only novel, The Picture of Dorian Gray, was greatly attacked for having themes of homoeroticism, and was part of the history that actualized his notoriety....   [tags: Biography, Author, Analysis]

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The Critic as Artist by Oscar Wilde

- Wilde felt that poetry was superior to the graphic arts for what reasons. Evaluate his claims. STUDENT Send instant message.Phone # not available. See all available user details.Send internal Webstudy mail.No external Web page available. In "The Critic as Artist," Oscar Wilde writes that literature is superior to the graphic arts, because unlike paintings of sunsets or portraits or other related forms of art, literature is "soul speaking to soul in those long-cadenced lines, not through form and colour alone…but with intellectual and emotional utterance, with lofty passion and with loftier thought, with imaginative insight, and with poetic aim" (2289)....   [tags: poetry, graphic, weaving]

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The Selfish Giant By Oscar Wilde

- “The Selfish Giant” is Oscar Wilde’s story about a giant that is selfish to all the children in his village, but once the weather turned on him he changed his ways. The giant couldn 't handle the harsh winter and seeing a child upset so his heart changed and he was no longer selfish. At the end he was taken to heaven for being a non selfish giant. Wilde used imagery, setting, characters, and plot to make “The Selfish Giant” a marvelous story. Wilde wrote “The Selfish Giant” to tell a story about one man 's, giant’s, change of heart and acceptance....   [tags: English-language films, Debut albums, Change]

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An Ideal Husband By Oscar Wilde

- ... They want a pristine marriage, but they cannot forgive if their husband done wrong. It is selfish on their part to have such high demands and give back their husband very little. This rigid view of husbands lasts through out the play, but it won 't stick to the end. The ladies will learn that they need to put as much effort into their marriages just like their husbands. Sir Robert Chiltern is one of the major man and he serves as a husband to his Lady Gertrude Chiltern. He is known to have an impressive political reputations and he is a good husband to his wife....   [tags: Marriage, Love, Husband, Wife]

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Oscar Wilde's An Ideal Husband

- In Oscar Wilde's play, “An Ideal Husband” Wilde's touches upon and focuses on many different sorts of themes such as forgiveness and the past and also marriage. Out of all these many different themes that this play explores in society around the time of 1895, the one that stood out to me the most and I found most striking was the theme of Femininity. Throughout the time that this play took place, Femininity was a very uncommon occurrence to experience. However Wilde uses this theme in order to emphasize the dependency of a woman during that time....   [tags: play analysis]

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Oscar Wilde- The Writer

- Throughout history, writers have made a larger impact on the world than any other type of people. Some have done more than others and are recognized more widely therefore. One prime example of an intellectual with a wide-spread influence on the world through his writing is none other than Oscar Wilde. His success can be traced to his abilities as a writer and an intellectual. His life has been full of harsh impacts and inspirations that have affected his style of writing to lead him to his fame amongst avid readers and scholars....   [tags: Success, Writer, Intellectual, Biography, Ireland]

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Oscar Wilde

- Between the years of 1837 and 1901, British history experienced a revolutionary period of economic and cultural growth. The new wealth that came with expansion created new class structures as an age of domesticity was inspired. As a result of this, the art world changed too. Writers became realistic as they believed they were serving a higher moral purpose while creating. They wrote of actual and practical life in the form of dramatic monologues. Visual imagery illustrated their emotions while their tone and sound reflected the poems meaning....   [tags: literature, Victorian era, poetry, controversy]

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The Importance of Truth, According to Oscar Wilde

- Mirroring his own life, Oscar Wilde’s witty plays explore the concept of truth and its role in shaping Victorian society. A vague question faced by readers is whether Wilde believed in untruth or supported the importance of truth. Oscar Wilde examines themes of truthfulness through the use of character deception in his social comedies The Importance of Being Ernest and Lady Windermere’s Fan. Both plays exploit situations shaped through secrecy and ultimately seeds a statement on social life, albeit a satirical one....   [tags: Literary Analysis]

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Oscar Wilde 's The Nightingale And The Rose

- “Good writing” is not simply defined by proper grammar, spelling, or style. It is far more than sentence construction and plot structure. Good writing utilizes thoughtful imagery and eloquent text to capture the audience’s interest. Oscar Wilde’s short story “The Nightingale and the Rose” and Kenneth Burke’s essay “The Definition of Man” implement vivid narration and descriptive language to enthrall the reader. Through the use of metaphors and symbolism, both authors create compelling subject matter....   [tags: Metaphor, Literature, Fiction, Literary theory]

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The Importance Of Being Earnest By Oscar Wilde

- Every text is an argument to the audience and every argument is influenced by a text and the audience surrounding the author. The Importance of Being Earnest is a play written by Oscar Wilde which was first performed in 1895. The plot centers around the proposal of marriage between Jack Worthing and Gwendolen Bracknell and also the proposal from Jack’s friend and Gwendolen 's cousin Algernon Moncrieff extended towards Jack’s ward, Cecily Cardew. In The Importance of Being Earnest, Oscar Wilde uses the ideas of his time period, his own background, and absurd comedy to argue that the views of marriage and gender held by those in Victorian Era England are wrong and hypocritical....   [tags: Victorian era, Marriage, Worthing]

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Oscar Wilde: Typifying the Victorian Era

- Oscar Wilde was born in October 16, 1854, in the mid era of the Victorian period—which was when Queen Victoria ruled. Queen Victoria reigned from 1837 to 1901.While she ruined Britain, the nation rise than never before, and no one thought that she was capable of doing that. “The Victorian era was both good and bad due to the rise and fall of the empires and many pointless wars were fought. During that time, culture and technology improved greatly” (Anne Shepherd, “Overview of the Victorian Era”)....   [tags: Literature, England, Gaol]

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The Importance Of Being Earnest By Oscar Wilde

- The Importance of Being Earnest is a play written by Oscar Wilde during the Victorian era. It is a farcical comedy in which the main characters live and maintain a fictional persona to escape their responsibilities. To which Oscar Wilde uses secondary characters within the play such as Lady Bracknell to humorously make her the tool of the conflict and much of the satire. She is the first and foremost a symbol of Victorian earnests and the unhappiness it brings as a result. Lady Bracknell was specially designed to represent Wilde’s opinion of the upper Victorian class repressiveness and traditional negativity....   [tags: Social class, Victorian era]

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The Picture of Dorian Grey, by Oscar Wilde

- Is it worth maintaining an ornately aesthetic life. Is it better to seek a moral lifestyle following society’s moral standards. With ideal appearances and superficial beauty, a decorated life can seem easier and more luxurious than a moral life. Leading a moral life is not as appealing to most people; and is filled with hardships and trouble over “doing the right thing”. One quality cannot be held without losing the other, due to their conflicting natures. While the novel The Picture of Dorian Gray brings out the central question “Is it better to pursue Aesthetics or Morality?” it describes the life of Dorian Gray, who constantly sought to maintain his appearance at the cost of his morals, a...   [tags: Aesthetics vs. Morality]

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The Importance Of Being Earnest By Oscar Wilde

- Despite the comedy in the ways in which women in the play are presented, Oscar Wilde forces even a modern audience to attend deeply to serious matters. To what extent is this the case in “The Importance of Being Earnest”. The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde is a comedy of manners in which the vast majority of the humor derives from Wilde’s portrayal of the female characters. The play is not meant to be serious, or to carry any particular moral message, as Wilde himself acknowledges in the plays subtitle that it is merely a "trivial comedy for serious people"....   [tags: Comedy, The Importance of Being Earnest]

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The Importance Of Being Earnest By Oscar Wilde

- ... Wilde goes on to prove in this particular reference, the lack of importance of compassion in this era through Lady Bracknell dismissing her reasoning of absence, as she concludes she will ‘now have a cup of tea and one of those nice cucumber sandwiches you promised me’. In a self-satisfied almost comical response, Algernon’s character replies ‘Certainly, Aunt Augusta’, and later adds ‘I hear her hair has turned quite gold with grief’, in terms of the circumstances, this would be considered an insufficient reply from Algernon’s character as he goes to get the sandwiches, but as the audience views this as a comical play, we disregard the interaction as a regularity....   [tags: Comedy, The Importance of Being Earnest]

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The Picture of Dorian Grey, by Oscar Wilde

- Is it worth maintaining an ornately aesthetic life. Is it better to seek a moral lifestyle following society’s moral standards. With ideal appearances and superficial beauty, a decorated life can seem easier and more luxurious than a moral life. Leading a moral life is not as appealing to most people; and is filled with hardships and trouble over “doing the right thing”. One quality cannot be held without losing the other, due to their conflicting natures. While the novel The Picture of Dorian Gray brings out the central question “Is it better to pursue Aesthetics or Morality?” it describes the life of Dorian Gray, who constantly sought to maintain his appearance at the cost of his morals, a...   [tags: Aesthetics vs. Morality]

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The Importance Of Being Earnest By Oscar Wilde

- Wilde’s Earnest Satire The Importance of Being Earnest is a comedic play that was written by Oscar Wilde in the late 1800s. He believed that people in the Victorian Era took life too seriously. He wrote this play with various forms of satire to ridicule the strict lifestyle the upper-class were boxed into. The upper class had pretentious values and behaviors that characterized Victorian life. During the Victorian Era, people were living under Queen Victoria’s monarch. During her reign, “Queen Victoria, conveyed connotations of "prudish, "repressed," and "old fashioned" (Roth)....   [tags: Victorian era, Love]

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Oscar Wilde Is The Best Example Of The Explanation

- in the small village of Berneval-Su-Mer near Preppe, France. Oscar Wilde’s legacy still lives on, “It is said that a man can be defeated but never destroyed. All man was not created for defeat” (Foster 121). Oscar Wilde is the best example of the explanation. The Victorian age was the time period where rapid change and developments in nearly every sphere was evident-from advances in medical, scientific, and technological knowledge to change in population and location. The Nineteenth Century was deeply affected by the country’s mood....   [tags: Victorian era, Social class, Meaning of life]

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The Importance Of Being Earnest By Oscar Wilde

- ... This is clearly mocking the upper classes as education is likely to lead to the opposite. It could also be read as a direct authorial comment from Wilde, as it is suggested that the rich were worried about the fear of a social revolution from the poor like the French Revolution at the end of the 18th century. Jack’s admission to having a house in Belgrave square adds to the melodrama of the scene however, Lady Bracknell’s over exaggerated reaction of shaking her head and saying “the unfashionable side” is where the real melodrama lies....   [tags: Comedy, The Importance of Being Earnest]

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The Importance Of Being Earnest By Oscar Wilde

- ... Cake is rarely seen at the best houses now-a-days” (Wilde 38). Cecily is the host while Gwendolen is the guest. Cecily gives Gwendolen an option between sweet or unsweet tea and bread and cake. That is what a host is supposed to do in their society. The host is required by society to provide finger food and drink for visitors. During the Victorian Era, being superficial was the current fashion of the people. Mr. Wilde engendered this play to show society how superficial they are being by writing a character named Lady Bracknell....   [tags: Victorian era, The Importance of Being Earnest]

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The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde

- The Importance Of Being Earnest. One of the Oscar Wilde’s most loved, well known and successful play ‘The Importance Of Being Earnest’ was written during the summer of 1894 at Worthing, England. It was first performed on 14 February 1895 at the St James’s theatre, London. Jack Worthing, the play’s main character was found and adopted by a wealthy man, Thomas Cardew in a handbag at a railway line where he was accidentally abandoned as a baby. All the respect that has been given to him as acknowledged upper-class Victorian is only because of his adopted father’s wealth....   [tags: story and character analysis]

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The Importance Of Being Earnest By Oscar Wilde

- Three hundred years ago A Midsummer-Night 's Dream written by William Shakespeare was printed in 1600. In this love sonnet Shakespeare compares his one and only love to a summer 's day, and he talks about the beauty of the two and their similarities. Everything in this world is connected in one way or another, it 's all entangled, and thus it gives a chance for there to be similarities; and two seemingly opposites such as, love and war, may have more in common than what we might have initially thought....   [tags: Marriage, Love, William Shakespeare, Similarity]

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The Importance Of Being Earnest By Oscar Wilde

- Sommer Wood Mocking Marriage “The Importance of Being Earnest” By Oscar Wilde, is a satirical play that has captured the attention of audiences for over a hundred years. Much of this plays popularity has stemmed from Wilde’s ability to direct viewers attention to the flaws of Victorian society, while maintaining a lighthearted and comical tone throughout. Although the play maintains a humorous nature, Wilde manages to touch on many issues surrounding the moral and social values held by many people in the Victorian era....   [tags: Marriage, Victorian era]

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The Importance Of Being Earnest By Oscar Wilde

- ... They are entirely too trustworthy and easily fooled into believing the lies of the two strange men (Jack and Algernon), immediately believing them to be their perfect husbands solely due to their names. Gwendolen in particular seems to fall out of love with Jack almost instantly after discovering that his name is not truly Earnest, in what is perhaps the perfect example of how mindless women were seen at the time. Again, with Lady Bracknell acting as an almost foil to Lady Bracknell rationally, albeit comedically, analyzes Jack, an approach not expected of women at the time....   [tags: Marriage, Gender role]

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The Importance Of Being Ernest By Oscar Wilde

- ... In Act 1, Algernon says, “Really, if the lower orders don’t set us a good example, what on earth is the use of them. They seem, as a class, to have absolutely no sense of moral responsibility.” This quote is contradicting the way we typically see societies structured. We would usually see the upper class set an example for the lower class. Algernon is insinuating that the upper class is corrupt and need to try and be as straightforward as the lower class (Wilde, 1734). The corrupt nature of the upper class is not a subject that is mentioned, typically, in nice and casual conversation....   [tags: Victorian era, The Importance of Being Earnest]

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The Importance Of Being Earnest By Oscar Wilde

- The title is “The Importance of Being Earnest” and it had multiple meanings. The first meaning is the irony between earnest and the name Earnest. The meaning of earnest is honesty, which causes irony because the is opposite of what Earnest demonstrates in the play. In addition, Earnest was not honest about his identity in the play and was living a double life. The second meaning is the importance of being honest, which he realized when he discovered his name is actually Earnest. II. Oscar Wilde was born October 16, 1854....   [tags: Social class, Victorian era, Sociology]

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The Importance Of Being Earnest By Oscar Wilde

- Identity and social class can be closely tied together. Identity is the part of a person that makes up who he/she is. Social class has been known ever since the late eighteenth century. In the play, The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde, Miss Prism’s identity of knowledge and education leads her into the middle class; while in the novel Frankenstein by Mary Shelley, the monster’s identity leads him into no social class at all, in which he becomes excluded from society. Also, in the play, Fences by August Wilson, Troy’s identity of being an African American male leads in a conflicting struggle with society and with his relationships in his family....   [tags: Social class, Sociology, Working class]

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The Importance Of Being Earnest By Oscar Wilde

- ... Throughout the play Jack feels that he needs to uphold certain gentleman characteristics to win over Lady Bracknell 's daughter Gwendolen. In doing so he is interviewed as a possible candidate for Gwendolen’s hand in marriage but is later rejected by Lady Bracknell due to his lack of pedigree. Jack states “I was well, I was found in a handbag” and in outrage with his response Lady Bracknell conveys that “you can hardly imagine that I and Lord Bracknell would dream of allowing our only daughter, a girl brought up with the utmost care, to marry into a cloak-room and form an alliance with a parcel.” These quotes are representation that for Jack to even be considered for marriage he needed t...   [tags: Fitzwilliam Darcy, Pride and Prejudice, Gender]

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Oscar Wilde's The Picture of Dorian Gray

- Oscar Wilde’s, The Picture of Dorian Grey shocked its earlier readers by its hints of abominable sins and was later used as evidence against him at the Old Bailey trial in 1895. The novel follows a young man who’s exquisite beauty captures the attention of an extremely talented yet somewhat conventionally minded artist, Basil Hallward, believing his boyish charm to be responsible for a breakthrough in his career. Dorian, in the opening chapters of the novel, meets Lord Henry Wotton, a close friend of Basil's, quickly becoming beguiled by the seemingly sophisticated man’s views of the world....   [tags: abominable sins, story and character analysis]

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Oscar Wilde's The Picture of Dorian Gray

- Oscar Wilde's The Picture of Dorian Gray      The Picture of Dorian Gray is a novel by Oscar Wilde. The genre of this novel can be classified as a comedy of manners or a gothic novel. The Picture of Dorian Gray was first published in 1890 in Lippincott’s Monthly Magazine. Another version with an additional six chapters was published in 1891. One of the major themes in the novel was the Supremacy of Beauty and Youth. A very attractive man has a portrait painted of himself, and after being warned of the mortality of his youth the man, Dorian, trades his soul to remain young while his portrait bears the markings of his age and evil deeds....   [tags: Wilde Dorian Gray Picture Essays]

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Oscar Wilde's The Importance Of Being Earnest

- Oscar Wilde's The Importance Of Being Earnest Setting: Begins in a flat in London then proceeds to a manor house in the countryside in the late 1800's. Plot: Two men, John Jack Earnest Worthing and Algernon Moncrieff, use the deception [a Bunbury] that both their names were Ernest, in order to secure marriage to the women they love, Gwendolen Fairfax and Cecily Cardew. Then there is the ultimate unraveling of their lies, which still ends in their impending nuptials.Cast of Key CharactersJohn Jack Ernest Worthing"Bon-vivant" [Jack to Algernon 2] Algernon is asking Jack what brought him to town....   [tags: Importance Being Earnest Wilde Essays]

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The Importance of Being Oscar Wilde

- In Dublin, Ireland in 1854 a future figure to in aesthetic writing was born to a famous surgeon Sir Robert Wills Wilde who earned his nonheritable title through his medical service. His mother, Jane Francesca Wilde supported Irish Nationalism. From a very young age, he excelled in his education, and was gifted in many languages. His early schooling took place in Enniskillen Portora Royal School, he attended Trinity College in 1873 as well as Magdalen College in Oxford, from 1874-1879. While he was in College he began his reputation as a poet, his early work did get him some success, he won the Newdigate prize for his poetry....   [tags: English literature, biography]

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The Trial of the Sensational Oscar Wilde

- The Trial of the Sensational Oscar Wilde   Ed Cohen's Talk on the Wilde Side discusses the trial of Oscar Wilde in 1895. Cohen explores the lack of legal transcripts of the case which relies on newspaper press reports and accounts to document this lawsuit. His investigations into the clarity of the newspaper accounts found that they "were themselves highly mediated stories whose narrative structures organized and gave meaningful shapes to the events they purported to accurately represent" (4)....   [tags: Biography Biographies Essays]

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Homosexuality in the Works of Oscar Wilde

- Homosexuality in Oscar Wilde's Work       "I turned half way around and saw Dorian Gray for the first time. I knew that I had come face to face with someone whose mere personality was so fascinating that, if I allowed it to do so, it would absorb my whole nature, my whole soul, my very art itself" (7). During the Victorian era, this was a dangerous quote. The Victorian era was about progress. It was an attempt aimed at cleaning up the society and setting a moral standard. The Victorian era was a time of relative peace and economic stability (Marshall 783)....   [tags: Biography Biographies Essays]

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The Misunderstood Legacy of Oscar Wilde

- The Misunderstood Legacy of Oscar Wilde Surrounded by scandal caused by his own deception, Oscar Wilde left this world with a legacy of often misunderstood wit, a brilliant collection of writing, and sordid tales of an extramarital homosexual affair. The playwright progressed from a fashionable, flippant fop immersed in London society to a man broken by the public discovery of his relationship with Lord Alfred Douglas. In his prime, Oscar Wilde was a social butterfly, admired and accepted by an artistic circle until his illicit affair became public; throughout his plays, he mocked the same London society with which he himself was quite involved....   [tags: Papers]

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Aubrey Beardsley and Oscar Wilde

- Aubrey Beardsley and Oscar Wilde Oscar Wilde claimed to have discovered Aubrey Beardsley, when he asked him to illustrate his Salome. However, many people have claimed the same thing. Author Robert Ross on the other hand, thinks that Beardsley really started with the men with whom his work will always be associated. The men he worked with on the Yellow Book. (Aubrey Beardsley, p.14). Aubrey was born on the twenty-first of August 1872, in Brighton England. He was a quiet reserved child of an upper middle class family....   [tags: Salome Plays Essays]

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Play: The Importance of Being Earnest, by Oscar Wilde

- Marriage in The Importance of Being Earnest The Importance of Being Earnest is a play by Oscar Wilde. Oscar describes his play as A Trivia comedy for serious people. The protagonists in the play maintains being fictitious in order to escape burdensome social obligations. The play is lighthearted with flippant comments and offhand jokes, however the play contains serious undertones and social commentary about marriage and the society. Oscar Wilde in his plat portrays marriage in the Victorian Era as arranged for the upper class....   [tags: Marriage, Victorian Era]

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The Life of Oscar Wilde

- The Life of Oscar Wilde The year is 1884 and many things have taken place in the life of our literary giant, Oscar Wilde has been married years and his touring of the United States and other countries have shown his of success in his writing all over the literary world. Some of his most recent writtings are "The Picture of Dorian Gray"(1891), "A Woman of No Importance"(1894) and his most resent essay known as "The Decay of Lying" is Oscar’s story of his outrage about the current style of writing that is going into the art society....   [tags: Biographies]

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Abstract Aestheticism in Oscar Wilde's The Picture of Dorian Gray

- 19th century England was entrenched in the idea that art could be used as not only a method of expression, but also one of social advancement. With this idea at its forefront, art suddenly inundated places where art was never previously found, such as social education and morality. In contrast, Oscar Wilde was a key advocate of an idea known aestheticism, a concept that relied on art simply being art. Oscar Wilde played a major role in Victorian England, having a major influence through his writing....   [tags: The Picture of Dorian Gray]

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Satirical Comments in The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde

- The class system during the Victorian Period played a significant role on people’s lives. The class a person belonged to played an important role in that individual’s future. In Victorian England, class diversity and class placement either hindered or enhanced people’s lives. One work of literature that comments on class distinctions in Victorian England is “The Importance of Being Earnest”, by Oscar Wilde. In “The Importance of Being Earnest”, Wilde expresses the concern with the Victorian people endeavoring to maintain an upper class reputation--while hiding the reality of their lives....   [tags: social classes, aristocracy]

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Analysis of Oscar Wilde´s The Picture of Dorian Gray

- “The picture of Dorian Gray” is considered the most important work of Oscar Wilde_a greatest English literary writer in nineteenth century. Wilde’s style is typical for the gospel of “Art for art’s sake”, it is also the reason why the fans of Gothic literature would find this novel absolutely attractive. The novel was written in 1891 which told a story about the life of a young man, Dorian Gray, or to be more exact, his spiritual life. The author touched upon many problems of contemporary life: morality, art and beauty in particular....   [tags: morality, art, beauty, spiritual]

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Dualism of a Double Life in Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde

- Oscar Wilde’s novel, Picture of Dorian Gray, portrays the dichotomy of the double life led by Dorian Gray.1 The contrast between the portrait and Dorian personifies the universal battle of sin versus morale and ultimately serves as a moral compass for society.2 Dorian’s development of a double life identifies with the results of sociological oppression leading to confinement.3 The development of this contrasting lifestyle inevitably influences a fatal deterioration of his soul and heart.4 Oscar Wilde’s exaggeration of the effects of the double life of Dorian Gray within his novel Picture of Dorian Gray ultimately conveys the degradation due to a confinement of the soul, and personifies the d...   [tags: Sin, Homosexuality, Oppression]

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