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The Republic By Plato

- "The Republic" by Plato The Republic written by Plato examines many things. It mainly is about the Good life. Plato seems to believe that the perfect life is led only under perfect conditions which is the perfect society. Within the perfect society there would have to be justice. In the Republic it seems that justice is defined many different ways. In this paper I am going to discuss a few. First I am going to discuss the reason why Glaucon and Adeimantus see justice as being a bad thing and it is better to live a unjust life....   [tags: Republic Justice Plato Essays]

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Plato's The Republic: Analysis of the Chapter Entitled "Allegory of the Cave"

- One of the world’s most revered philosophers, Plato, was born in 428 BC. As a young man, Plato, became a devout student of Socrates. Plato quickly adopted Socrates’ teachings and turned his studies toward the question of virtue and noble character. After the execution of his beloved mentor, Plato founded the first English university called the Academy. He wanted thinkers to have a place were they could word toward better government for Greek cities. Over the duration of his life Plato wrote many books, and his most influential work is The Republic....   [tags: The Republic, Plato]

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Justice in Plato´s The Republic

- In book four of Plato's “The Republic” Socrates defines justice in the individual as analogous to justice in the state. I will explain Socrates' definition of justice in the individual, and then show that Socrates cannot certify that his definition of justice is correct, without asking further questions about justice. I will argue that if we act according to this definition of justice, then we do not know when we are acting just. Since neither the meaning of justice, nor the meaning of good judgement, is contained in the definition, then one can act unjustly while obeying to the definition of justice....   [tags: Plato's The Republic]

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Observations on the Writing Profession in The Republic by Plato

- Questioning of the Writing Profession Plato’s The Republic For all the time today’s students spend learning to write well, Plato is skeptical of those who spend their lives crafting words. In the tenth chapter of The Republic, Socrates condemns poets as imitators. In the dialogue that bears his name, Phaedrus wonders whether words in the constructed rhythms of speech or poetry will obscure Truth, the philosopher’s ultimate goal. Speech-writing is just the clever use of rhetorical device, poetry is faulty imitation, and both empty voices can deceive us....   [tags: Plato's Republic Essays]

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Model of Justice in Plato's The Republic

- Model of Justice in Plato's The Republic In what is perhaps his most well-known text, The Republic, Plato explores the fundamental concept of justice, how it is observed in the world, and its application to the lives of men. When he identifies the good in Book VI, which is reality and knowledge in their true forms, Plato also describes the visual world of shadows and false reality that people perceive and is cast by the sun. What follows from these definitions is that, while justice is a concept that exists autonomously from injustice and other fleeting conditions, injustice requires justice to be a medium for it to exist, develop, and spread itself....   [tags: Republic Plato Philosophy]

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Plato’s Theory of The Soul in The Republic

- Plato’s Republic introduces a multitude of important and interesting concepts, of topics ranging from music, to gender equality, to political regime. For this reason, many philosophers and scholars still look back to The Republic in spite of its age. Yet one part that stands out in particular is Plato’s discussion of the soul in the fourth book of the Republic. Not only is this section interesting, but it was also extremely important for all proceeding moral philosophy, as Plato’s definition has been used ever since as a standard since then....   [tags: Literary Analysis, Plato, Republic]

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The Republic By Plato

- The purpose of The Republic by Plato is to explain, define and seek the true definition of justice and highlight the flaws of the democratic political system. Plato constructs the argument that leaders of a nation (kings) should become philosophers, or philosophers should become kings. Throughout his book, Plato deliberately expresses his belief that it takes a special kind of knowledge and wisdom to rule a nation justly and successfully. The cave is depicted as a allegory that explains the path one has to take when it comes to education in order to achieve the ultimate source of good, knowledge....   [tags: Philosophy, Plato, Justice, Ontology]

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Plato's The Republic and Aristophanes The Birds

- Plato's The Republic and Aristophanes The Birds      It is evident, by Plato's The Republic and Aristophanes The Bird's, that one's vision of an ideal state is not the same mystical utopia. Plato's Republic is an well-ordered society that emphasizes the development of the community, which leads to its people believing in this philosophy. Cloudcuckooland, the idea of two lazy Athenians, is an unorganized society that lacks the substance to make it a workable society. I would much rather live in the organized Republic to the unorganized Cloudcuckooland....   [tags: Plato Republic Aristophanes Birds Essays]

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Plato’s Republic and the Just War Theory Versus Humanitarian Intervention

- American involvement in humanitarian intervention is one of the most controversial issues in contemporary US foreign policy. The definition of humanitarian intervention is a military intervention; entering into a country for the purposes of saving lives and protecting citizens from the violation of their human rights. As in all debates, there are always two sides. One side disputes that military force should only be applied when, in the words of former Secretary of Defense Weinberger, ‘a vital national interest is at stake.’ ¹ The opposing side disputes that the US should apply military force to mediate when in the words of former president Clinton, “someone comes after innocent civilians…an...   [tags: plato, republic, war]

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Justice In Plato's The Republic

- Justice In Plato's The Republic Ralph Waldo Emerson once wrote “One man’s justice is another’s injustice.” This statement quite adequately describes the relation between definitions of justice presented by Polemarchus and Thrasymachus in Book I of the Republic. Polemarchus initially asserts that justice is “to give to each what is owed” (Republic 331d), a definition he picked up from Simonides. Then, through the unrelenting questioning of Socrates, Polemarchus’ definition evolves into “doing good to friends and harm to enemies” (Republic 332d), but this definition proves insufficient to Socrates also....   [tags: Plato Republic Justice Philosophy Essays]

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Justice in Plato's Republic

- Justice in Plato's Republic Justice. What is justice. In this world where many people look out only for themselves, justice can be considered the happiness of oneself. But because selfish men do not always decide our standards in society, to find a definition, society should look at the opinions of many. Just as in the modern society to which we live, where everyone feels justice has a different meaning, the society of Plato also struggled with the same problem. In this paper, I will look into the Republic, one of the books of Plato that resides heavily on defining an answer to the meaning of Justice, and try to find an absolute definition....   [tags: Papers Justice Plato Republic Essays]

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Human Nature and Moral Theory in Plato’s Republic

- Human Nature and Moral Theory in Plato’s Republic In Chapter 2 of Republic, Glaucon uses the Myth of the Lydian Shepherd to portray a pessimistic view of human nature. Plato, the author of Republic, uses his brother Glaucon to tell the Myth of the Lydian Shepherd. We are led to believe that Plato takes the myth and its implications on human nature very seriously by use of a personal character. The argument, originally given by Thrasymachus, contends that at the root of our human nature we all yearn for the most profit possible....   [tags: Plato Republic]

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Plato’s View of Division of Labor in Plato’s Republic

- Plato’s view of division of labour is divided into three types of peoples’ task in life which are workers as farmers, military type and guardians. Actually, the ruling task of Plato’s Republic is the guardian’s responsible who had achieved the greatest wisdom or knowledge of good. Due to that, Plato claims that “philosopher must become kings or those now who called kings must genuinely and adequately philosophise’’ (Nussbaum1998, p.18). However, people argue about the reasons that the philosopher should rule the city, while the philosophers prefer to gain knowledge instead of power, thus they don’t seek this authority....   [tags: Plato, Divisions of Labor, Plato’s Republic, Repub]

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Plato’s Republic: Justice and Injustice in Thrasymachus' Account

- Plato’s Republic: Justice and Injustice in Thrasymachus' Account ABSTRACT: This paper has a two-fold task. First, I show that there are three types of individuals associated with the Thrasymachean view of society: (a) the many, i.e., the ruled or those exploited individuals who are just and obey the laws of the society; (b) the tyrant or ruler who sets down laws in the society in order to exploit the many for personal advantage; (c) the "stronger" individual (kreittoon) or member of the society who is detached from the many and aspires to become the tyrant....   [tags: Plato Republic]

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The Importance of Thrasymachus in Plato’s Republic

- The Importance of Thrasymachus in Plato’s Republic      Dr. Malters’s comments: This student does two things quite remarkable for an undergraduate student. In his compact essay, not only does he display an in-depth understanding of complex perspectives on justice put forth by the protagonist Socrates, he deftly explains how Plato has artfully made rude objections by a seemingly minor character early in the dialogue function as a structuring device for nearly all the important ideas examined thereafter....   [tags: Plato Republic Essays]

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Plato's Republic

- Plato's Republic In Plato’s Republic, Glaucon is introduced to the reader as a man who loves honor, sex, and luxury. As The Republic progresses through books and Socrates’ arguments of how and why these flaws make the soul unhappy began to piece together, Glaucon relates some of these cases to his own life, and begins to see how Socrates’ line of reasoning makes more sense than his own. Once Glaucon comes to this realization, he embarks on a path of change on his outlook of what happiness is, and this change is evidenced by the way he responds during he and Socrates’ discourse....   [tags: Plato Republic Glaucon Essays]

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The Apology Of Socrates And The Republic Of Plato

- ... Even when we get the idea that he is trying to avoid a certain topic, Socrates always knows the right thing to say and the people around him never realize what he is actually doing. I feel like the whole book is proof of this; a conversation between Socrates and these young men about what justice is. He gives us the idea that he knows what justice is, but by the end of the book we never get a clear definition. Socrates clearly tells us what justice is not, but we never get a sense of what he thinks justice is....   [tags: Plato, Socrates, Apology, Athens]

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Analysis Of ' The Republic Of Plato '

- ... Polemarchus, Cephalus 's son interjects at Socrates claim. Calling him the “Heir of the argument” (331e) Socrates instigates with Polemarchus for further knowledge of his interpretation of justice while Cephalus is dissolved of the conversation. Socrates does not use a scientific method in his approach to test against such events that lead through his discussions with Polemarchus, Adeiamantus, or Glaucon in Books I-VI of The Republic, but attempts to build confidence within each party member that justice is truly good and should be practised even without conventional goods....   [tags: Plato, Soul, Lie, Justice]

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The Republic Of Plato : A Life Of Justice

- In this essay, I argue that it is better to lead a life of justice than a life of injustice. In The Republic of Plato, Socrates sets out to determine what justice is. He and a group of his peers discuss justice, its core tenants, and what it means to lead a just life. Socrates is then accosted by three of his peers. Their argument is that the man who leads a life of injustice will be happier, make more profits, and succeed in life more than the man who is just. Socrates argues each of these claims until his peers admit that they have been bested by his logic....   [tags: Soul, Plato, Justice, Ethics]

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Censorship Of The Republic By Plato

- ... “At any rate, it ought to end where it has ended; for surely training in the musical crafts ought to end in a passion for beauty” (121). Plato believed that the arts should be banned from the society because people fight over beautiful things, art and music can be considered beautiful, and therefore people will fight over art and music. Even if this is true, this new city-state would be cultureless society. In the educational process of the youth, they would only learn the trade or job they will be doing for the rest of their life....   [tags: Plato, Knowledge, Democracy, Philosophy]

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Socrates And The Republic By Plato

- ... For instance, the virtue of hedge trimmers is their sharpness which helps them to perform their function of trimming bushes well. Likewise, an airplane performs its function of flying well by its virtue of wings. Furthermore, glasses perform their function of enhancing vision by their virtue of lenses. Another example would be a flashlight which performs its function of providing light well by its virtue of a working light bulb. So as shown something performs its function well because of the virtue that it obtains....   [tags: Justice, Ethics, Soul, Plato]

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Analysis Of Plato 's The Republic Of Plato

- ... This poses the debate on how societies are mandated, regulated, and governed. Who is there to maintain order within the general public, and what characteristics do they have that make them reliable overseers. This is where the virtues of character come into play for Plato’s defense. Plato introduces a new branch of people, the guardians. This diversion is created to divide society into the common people and those that protect and govern the common people. Plato later goes on to divide the group of guardians even further by dividing them into the soldiers, who protect the state and enforce laws, and the rulers who resolve conflict and decide on public policy....   [tags: Soul, Plato, Reason, Philosophy]

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The Republic of Plato

- Plato and Aristotle were both very influential men of there time bringing vast knowledge to the world. I honestly believe that Democracy does a lot of good but it definitely has some common side effects. Out of all of Plato's significant ideas, his best was the idea of democracy opening political decisions to the majority who cannot think on behalf of the community. Aristotle on the other hand is very optimistic when it comes to democracy so it becomes a rather interesting compare and contrast between these to men....   [tags: democracy, aristotle, corrupt souls]

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The Republic by Plato

- Wisdom, courage, moderation and justice are four essential virtues the ideal state must be built upon, as explained by Socrates in Plato’s Republic. Throughout the eight books of Socratic dialogue the ideal state and ideas of justice are debated, on both individual and state levels. The guidelines for a perfect state and how it will come about are thoroughly described. Socrates covers every aspect of political life and how it should work stating that “until power and philosophy entirely coincide… cities will have no rest form evils” ....   [tags: Socrates, Caractersitics]

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The Republic by Plato

- In Plato’s Republic Book 1, Thrasymachus argues that morality is the advantage of the stronger. To support his view, Thrasymachus first claims that the governments, which are the stronger parties, always pass laws based on their own interest, and then argues that subjects must always obey these laws, therefore morality is the advantage of the stronger. Socrates gives two sets of counter arguments. First, by differentiating apparent advantage and actual advantage to the stronger, Socrates argues that the obedience to the laws by the subjects can be occasionally not in the actual interest of the rulers....   [tags: Thrasymachus' Morality, ruling party]

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The Republic of Plato

- In Book one of the Republic of Plato, several definitions of justice versus injustice are explored. Cephalus, Polemarchus, Glaucon and Thracymicus all share their opinions and ideas on what actions they believe to be just, while Socrates questions various aspects of the definitions. In book one, Socrates is challenged by Thracymicus, who believes that injustice is advantageous, but eventually convinces him that his definition is invalid. Cephalus speaks about honesty and issues of legality, Polemarchus explores ideas regarding giving to one what is owed, Glaucon views justice as actions committed for their consequences, and Socrates argues that justice does not involve harming anybody....   [tags: Cephalus, Polemarchus, Glaucon]

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Justice and Moderation of the Soul in The Republic, by Plato

- In his philosophical text, The Republic, Plato argues that justice can only be realized by the moderation of the soul, which he claims reflects as the moderation of the city. He engages in a debate, via the persona of Socrates, with Ademantus and Gaucon on the benefit, or lack thereof, for the man who leads a just life. I shall argue that this analogy reflecting the governing of forces in the soul and in city serves as a sufficient device in proving that justice is beneficial to those who believe in, and practice it....   [tags: The Republic Essays]

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Analysis Of Socrates Argument On Plato 's Republic And Plato

- In this paper I will give an in depth analysis of Socrates argument in Plato’s Republic and in Plato’s Phaedo. First I will begin with the analysis of the Republic, a discussion between Socrates and Glaucon on morality of the human being. The argument first defines morality within a good community and proceeds with the application of this definition in the human person. Then I shall analysis Phaedo, Socrates argument of immortality of the soul. Using his argument of death, reincarnation, change and invisibility, I shall explain Socrates rejoice of death....   [tags: Plato, Soul, Reincarnation, Philosophy]

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The Republic, by Plato

- Plato’s ideal society is one that depends on the just actions of its people. In his utopia, all men and women are able to maximize their potential and in turn utilize their talents and skills for the good of all. Happy citizens form a happy society. This perfect society has been both praised and criticized on the basis of some radical elements it possesses: The citizens of Plato’s ideal society are able to curb their self-interest, and because they are happy, or at least psychologically conditioned to believe that they are, these people choose to join in the collective effort and submit to the philosopher-king’s rule for the benefit of all....   [tags: Reflection, Utopia, Conditioning]

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Analysis Of The Republic Of Plato 's Republic

- In Book II of Plato’s Republic, Glaucon seeks to define what justice is and whether it could truly be considered an end in itself. He starts by asserting that there are three types of good. First there are goods that we choose out pure enjoyment and pleasure, these goods have no negative after effects. Second are the goods that are valued for what they are in and of themselves not just the good that comes from them. Thirdly there are the goods that an individual will only pursue because of what they believe they will acquire, not for what they are themselves.(36) Glaucon believes that justice should be placed in the second tier of goods where everything of intrinsic value is also placed....   [tags: Ethics, Utilitarianism]

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Socrates' Aim in "The Republic of Plato"

- From the very beginning of The Republic of Plato it has been Socrates’ aim to prove to Adeimantus and Glaucon, why men lead just lives. In order to thoroughly explain his point of view as we now know Socrates went about setting up his city of thought. Through the formation of the city of thought we are first introduced to Socrates idea of what his ideally just city would be like and how it would be formed. We are from the formation of this completely just city introduced us to the minds of the “philosopher-kings” who are to be the rulers of Socrates’ city....   [tags: Philosophy]

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Education in The Republic of Plato

- The educated have a duty to help the less educated in a respectful way. Education, Every society throughout history has respected their scholars and scientists, but what responsibilities do the educated have. Some might argued that the educated must take care of the less educated or that they have no civic duty, however according to the famous Greek philosopher Plato this is simply not true. Plato was born around the year 428 BCE in Athens and was one of Socrates students; Socrates being another very influential Greek scholar laid the foundations for many of Plato’s theory’s that appear in his famous work “The Republic” (http://www.egs.edu/library/plato/biography/)....   [tags: analogy of the cave, death]

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The Republic of Plato: The Debate

- Thrasymachus, Polemarchus, Cleitophon, and Socrates’ heated debate over the nature of justice in Book 1 of The Republic of Plato comes to an intriguing point of argument wherein both parties go back and forth over justice being the “advantage of the stronger”(15). It is clear that Socrates presents a more sound and logical counterargument as he calls upon the duties and abilities of professionals in their fields and how they benefit not only themselves but humanity at large as well. His skill in argument serves him well and the clear victor in the debate as the textual evidence is easily observable both in Plato’s presentation of the squabble and in Thrasymachus’ responses....   [tags: Greek Literature]

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The Republic by Plato

- Introduction The Republic began in 508 BC and lasted for 483 years. The office of the Praetor came about in 367 BC. The functions of the praetor were to aid the civil law, done through the grant of rights of actions for the enforcement of civil claims and to help the consuls in the day-to-day administration of justice. In 242 BC, thirty years later, another praetor was added, thus there were two praetors. The praetor urbanus had jurisdiction to decide cases and administer justice among Roman citizens whilst the praetor peregrinus had to take care of cases between citizens and foreigners, and foreigners amongst themselves....   [tags: roman state, the praetor]

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The Republic By Plato Is An Elaborate Depiction Of The Individual As A Utopian City

- ... In Plato’s theory, the cave represents people who believe that knowledge comes from what we see and hear in the world – empirical evidence. The raised wall and chains symbolize the limitations in our thinking. The cave shows that believers of empirical knowledge are trapped in a ‘cave’ of misunderstanding when Socrates proposes the question- what if one of the prisoners was to be freed and “compelled to turn his neck around and walk towards the light” (515c). The light would hurt his eyes, as comfortable and adapted as he was to the shadows (515c)....   [tags: Philosophy, Plato, Socrates, The Prisoner]

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The Republic by Plato

- The Republic by Plato At the beginning of Book I, we are introduced to the narrator, Socrates, and his audience of peers. We are made aware, however, of Socrates' special charm and intellectual gifts through the insistence of Polemarchus and the other men for the pleasure of his company. The tone is casual and language and modes of expression rather simple, as is commonly the case in Plato's dialogues. However, Plato's unaffected style serves at least two purposes. For one it belies the complexity and elevation of the ideas, thus it is in accord with Socrates' characteristic irony itself, which draws the "fool" in by feigned ignorance, only so that the master can show that he does...   [tags: essays research papers]

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The Dimensions of Morality in The Prince and The Republic of Plato

- Morality is likely the most debated topic of all time, especially in regards to our moral responsibility for each other. Throughout history many writers and philosophers have taken different angles the concept of morality and have applied it in many ways. This includes: Niccolò Machiavelli with The Prince (we will be looking at The Qualities of the Prince) and Plato with The Republic (we will be looking at the section The Allegory of the Cave. The Prince (1513) essentially lays out a how-to guide of how to obtain power and how to keep it; The Qualities of the Prince contains a list of qualities that one should appear to have while in power; this work will be used to represent the case agains...   [tags: philosophy, allegory of the cave]

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The Allegory of the Cave by Socrates and The Republic of Plato

- In my paper I will address the interdisciplinary relationship between the Western philosopher Socrates’ in the Allegory of the Cave, an excerpt from Republic by Plato, and the Eastern mystic Paramhamsa Yogananda’s Autobiography of a Yogi. I will examine Yogananda’s Autobiography through the Platonic monocle and reason on why there are flaws in the allegory and how that can be corrected by adopting bifocals that combines both. The objective of this is to inspect, delve, and widen Socrates’s perspective that there are extra factors that relate to the steps that lead up to the light....   [tags: autobiography, prisoners, philosophy]

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Beauty and Love in the Republic of Plato

- The first question that pops into one’s mind when mentioning beauty in a philosophical context is whether it is objective or subjective. Do things bring pleasure because they are beautiful, or are things beautiful because they bring pleasure. It is a question that has created a major disagreement amongst certain of the greatest philosophical minds. It is commonly agreed upon that beauty is an ultimate value along with goodness, truth and justice. However, it does not exist in the thing itself, but is rather individually perceived....   [tags: philosophy, objective, subjective]

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Comparing Nietzsche And Plato 's The Republic

- In accordance with the New Oxford American Dictionary, a craft is a skilled activity or profession, whereas an analogy compares two things that are alike in some way. In addition, a democratic system is a system of government by the whole population or all the eligible members of a state, typically through elected representatives (Merriam-Webster, 2003). Nonetheless, this paper will focus on a debate that deals with the opposite and agreement that involves; governing a craft the same way as medicine or shoemaking and the implications it has on democracy....   [tags: Democracy, Plato, Skill, Socrates]

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Plato 's The Republic Written By Socrates

- ... Likewise, they have no knowledge of the form of mathematics in all of its shapes, sizes, and so on. Philosophers are the only sorts of people who truly know the forms in their entirety that is things of an intangible nature. Therefore as Socrates claims, people who know shapes and sizes only know the shapes and sizes themselves. They only know what a rectangle is rather than having any true knowledge about what a rectangle is in its most distilled form. Thus, the only sorts of people who possess such knowledge are Philosophers....   [tags: Human, Logic, Plato, Platonism]

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The Core Themes Of Plato 's Republic

- One of the core themes in Plato’s Republic is the notion that the attainment of a just and good society can only fulfilled when its citizens strive to gain knowledge and improve upon their capabilities. Only through enlightenment may one learn the truths of our world, and it is through this illumination that one can begin to work toward the betterment of humanity. Nevertheless, not everybody can reach this level of understanding, thus making it the duty of these enlightened individuals, the ‘philosopher-kings,’ to guide the rest of society down a prosperous path....   [tags: Truth, Plato, Augustine of Hippo, Platonism]

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Plato 's Republic, Justice And The Soul

- ... Kephalos defines justice as returning what one has received (Ten Essays, Leo Strauss, page 169). On the other hand, Kaphalos’ son, Polemarchus, states that justice is found in harming one’s enemies and helping ones’ friends (Republic, 332D). The final opinion in the discussion is given by Thrasymachus as he says: “justice is nothing else than the interest of the stronger” (Republic, 338C). However, the lack of knowledge to apply their definitions in reality creates a problem for Socrates. For example, Polemarchos’ view on justice requires a person to be able to distinguish between a friend and an enemy (History of political philosophy, Leo Strauss, 36)....   [tags: Plato, Justice, Philosophy, Political philosophy]

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Plato's Explanation of an Ideal State in his Work, The Republic

- What is the ideal state. This question has sparked debate since the very formation of organized political society. In Plato’s The Republic, Plato seeks to define justice and in doing so he seeks to explain the ideal just state. In Plato’s explanation of an ideal state, there is an extreme emphasis on unity and harmony. The reason unity and harmony are so important to Plato are because they are responsible for bonding together Plato’s ideal state and protecting it from tyranny. Plato explains at great length the framework which ties together the individual soul with the ideal political society....   [tags: The Republic]

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Plato's Ideas About Philosopher Kings Depicted in Republic

- In Plato's most famous work 'Republic' he puts forward the view that only the study of philosophy would allow man to see what was good and just. Therefore to cure the ill's of society it would be necessary to either make kings philosophers or make philosophers kings. I intend to show how Plato justifies this view and then attempt to point out some possible problems with this justification and to forward my own view that 'the people' should ultimately be king. Plato's starting point was his recognition that justice was one of four cardinal virtues, along with wisdom, courage and moderation, that when working harmoniously together in a high level of order - he felt equalled the elusive 'good l...   [tags: Republic]

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The Philosophy Of Plato 's The Book Republic

- In the book Republic, Plato is on a quest to define Justice as he builds the ideal city. His city is ruled by philosopher kings, the true rulers. Philosophers, in Plato’s opinion, are best fit to rule and judge because of their love of knowledge and wisdom. When arguing philosophers have the experiences of all regimes Plato says, “The philosopher to have tasted the kind of pleasure that comes from the sight of things as they truly are. ‘so far as experiences goes, then,’ I said, ‘he is the one who is in the best position to judge” (325)....   [tags: Democracy, Plato, Oligarchy, Government]

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Justice and Good in The Republic by Plato.

- In The Republic, Plato strives to display through the character and conversations of Socrates that justice is better than just the proper good for which men must strive for, regardless of whether they could receive equal benefit from choosing otherwise. His method is to use the dialogue from Socrates, questions which led the reader from one point to another, supposedly with convincing logic by obtaining agreement to each point before proceeding to the next, and so constructing an intriguing argument....   [tags: essays research papers]

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Plato's Meno and Plato's Republic

- 1. In Plato’s Meno, Socrates claims that all learning is actually recollection (80d – 86c). What prompts Socrates to make this claim, and what does he mean by it. As Socrates and Meno were trying to find out the essence of virtues, Socrates said: “The soul, then, as being immortal, and having been born again many times, and having seen all things that exist, whether in this world or in the world below, has knowledge of them all; and it is no wonder that she should be able to call to remembrance all that she ever knew about virtue, and about everything; for as all nature is akin, and the soul has learned all things1.” As he suggested, the soul has already known everything, and thus the acqui...   [tags: Socrate, philosophical analysis]

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Justice in The Republic by Plato

- Justice in The Republic by Plato In Plato's The Republic, justice is depicted as a major part in a perfect society. Justice is said to breed a good society, whereas injustice will breed a bad one. Plato defines justice in dialogue as "keeping what is properly one's own and doing one's own job." (Pg. 146) Under the rules set for this perfect society, people are to practice the one profession at which they perform best. This profession also corresponds to a certain social class. Under no circumstances can one change this profession....   [tags: Papers]

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Socrates and Plato's The Republic

- Socrates and Plato's The Republic Throughout his life, Socrates engaged in critical thinking as a means to uncover the standards of holiness, all the while teaching his apprentices the importance of continual inquiry in accordance with obeying the laws. Socrates primarily focuses on defining that which is holy in The Euthyphro – a critical discussion that acts as a springboard for his philosophical defense of the importance of lifelong curiosity that leads to public inquiry in The Apology. Socrates continues his quest for enlightenment in The Crito, wherein he attempts to explain that while inquiry is necessary, public curiosity has its lawful price, thus those who inquire must both contin...   [tags: Philosophy Philosophical Republic Essays]

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Comparing Plato 's Republic And The Virtues Of The Soul

- ... So speaking the truth and repaying what one borrows is not the definition of justice. Polemarchus argues that being just involves helping friends and causing harm to enemies. This is proven inaccurate when Plato argues that our friends are not always virtuous and the people we view as enemies are not always societies worst people. Thrasymachus argues that justice can be defined as the advantage of the stronger. It is only worth it to be just if it benefits others. Socrates discusses three main arguments which support the idea that the just life is favored over the unjust life....   [tags: Justice, Virtue, Plato, Ethics]

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The As A Role Model Of Book 1 Of Plato 's Republic

- ... However, instead of mourning the loss of his youth alongside his friends, Cephalus proves his maturity and wisdom when he explains to Socrates, “a great peace and freedom from such things [such as sexual desires] comes to pass in old age” (329c; 329d). Also, Cephalus’ sole reason for discussing justice sprouts from an enlightened analysis of his past: “when someone is close to imagining that he is coming to the end, fear and care come into him about things that didn’t enter his thoughts before” (330d)....   [tags: Plato, Justice, Virtue, Philosophy]

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The Ethical Egoist in Plato's Republic

- The ethical egoist is one who believes that it is morally right to act strictly in one's own self-interest. Understandably, this belief poses a threat to social cooperation and, therefore, clearly introduces a significant political problem. I believe that the best example of ethical egoism is displayed in Book I of Plato's The Republic. In this Book, Plato introduces the idea of ethical egoism, explains the political problem posed by it, and addresses the problem through the words of Socrates. I will use this paper to explain and clarify the arguments for and against the concept of ethical egoism, with specific focus on the political problem it poses and the proper approach to addressing th...   [tags: politics, ethical egoism, socrates]

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An Analysis of Plato's Republic

- Explain the passage’s meaning in context. Societies hold value in the respect and virtuous abilities over others often times put justice on a pedestal and hold tight to it. In the eyes of Socrates is Plato’s Republic, Book VI he states that “In a suitable one [constitution], his [a philosopher's] own growth will be fuller and he will save the community as well as himself” (Plato “Republic”, p. 177, 497a). When you break it down this quote means when abiding by the laws held by the community each man must try to pursue the most virtuous version of themselves....   [tags: virtuous, philosophy, justice]

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The Noble Lie: Plato's Republic

- The concept of the noble lie begins with Plato in the Republic, where in search of an ideal state he told of a magnificent myth^1.The society that Plato imagined was separated into a three tier class structure- the Rulers, Auxiliaries, and the labor or working class. The Rulers, he said, would be selected from the military elite (called Guardians).The rulers would be those Guardians that showed the most promise, natural skill, and had proven that they cared only about the community’s best interests....   [tags: philosophy and politics]

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Plato And Aristotle 's Views On The Republic And Politics

- ... According to Plato, a philosopher must have knowledge of the forms, like the truth. The forms do not exist in the sensible world, but can be found in an overly practical world. Plato 's forms theory is half logical and half abstract. Forms are universal and long-lasting, and perfect and unique. Knowing this truth, the philosopher-kings will always know what is best for society with total wisdom, justice and virtue. He writes that “the philosopher whose dealings are with divine order himself acquires the characteristics of order and divinity” (500d)....   [tags: Plato, Aristotle, Democracy, Oligarchy]

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Analysis Of Plato 's The Republic

- Plato (425-348 BCE) is the most ancient philosopher of all times and his existence is proven through his written works, with the Republic being one of them (Leckey lecture). (Plato is a widely recognized ancient philosopher due to his existence being documented throughout time by the means of his own written works.) In the Republic, Plato argues why poetry is detrimental to the people and how it does so. The effects that poetry has on people eventually forced Plato to exile all the poets from this ideally perfect city, the Republic....   [tags: Poetry, Homer, Translation, Aristotle]

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Plato's Republic

- In reading the Republic, there is no reason to search for arguments which show that Platonic justice ('inner justice' or 'psychic harmony') entails ordinary justice. The relationship between inner justice and ordinary justice is of no importance in Plato's Republic. We note that Plato tries to argue from the very first book that the true source of normativity lies in knowledge attained by philosophical reason. What is crucial, then, is the relationship between inner justice and acts which brings about a just polis....   [tags: Philosophy Justice Plato Papers]

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Plato 's Theory Of The Soul

- Plato taught his contemporaries of the idea of the soul and how it has a desire and goal to become a pure. To do this Plato stressed that every human being must compare him or herself to the most high, Godly truth. To accomplish this, humans were expected to live by the universal example by struggling with bodily temptations and sins to be able to keep the soul pure. Plato’s thoughts became the forerunner and basis for many religions in his time and overall applied to all humans as a code of how to live....   [tags: Plato, Soul, Democracy, Republic]

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The Reading Of Plato 's Republic

- ... When this form of government devolves to Democracy, which rises out of neglect of the temperance of the citizens (Plato 252). This cause revolution, and exile of the previous opponents. However, according to Socrates, they become slaves to freedom and to their appetites. This eventually causes chaos, and in order to maintain some type of order, a tyrant takes hold, beginning the dawn of Tyranny, in which an absolute ruler has absolute control. Throughout the decay from Aristocracy to tyranny, the divide between classes widens more and more....   [tags: Karl Marx, Marxism, Working class, Social class]

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Plato and The Republic

- Plato and The Republic 360 BC THE REPUBLIC by Plato translated by Benjamin Jowett 360 B.C. THE INTRODUCTION THE Republic of Plato is the longest of his works with the exception of the Laws, and is certainly the greatest of them. There are nearer approaches to modern metaphysics in the Philebus and in the Sophist; the Politicus or Statesman is more ideal; the form and institutions of the State are more clearly drawn out in the Laws; as works of art, the Symposium and the Protagoras are of higher excellence....   [tags: Papers]

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Plato and the Republic

- The Sun of Knowledge: Platonic Epistemology as Discussed in The Republic The history of philosophy can be viewed as the result of the work of an obscure Athenian whose voluminous works, penetrating questions, novel ideas, and didactic teachings have shaped the flow of nearly all philosophic thought. It has been said that the influence of the ancient Greek philosopher named Plato has laid the foundation for Western culture. Plato was born to an aristocratic family in Athens in 428/427 B.C....   [tags: essays research papers fc]

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Plato's Republic

- The Philosopher King stands far above others in ancient Athens. At his own peril, amidst constant political chaos and corruption, Plato takes a brave stand for justice, for freedom, and for equality. The Republic, written around 375 B.C., isn't just Plato's treatise on the ideal state, nor is it just a state-of-mind journey from ignorance to enlightenment. Plato also taught at his Academy, the first university in Europe, that political science is the science of the soul. Indeed, Plato's wisdom is a striking example of visionary perfection, where a pure idea of virtue allows the greatest possible human freedom in accordance with laws by which the freedom of each is made to be consistent with...   [tags: Philosophy]

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Analysis of Plato´s Republic

- Republic, perhaps Plato’s most famous work focusing on justice and its values, is also home to Socrates’ unique ideas and the challenges that he faces throughout his dialogues with other philosophers. Nevertheless, justice is not the only topic that Plato examines in his work. In the Republic, a simple discussion of the justice and the different characteristics of cities, escalates into a discussion about the souls of individuals. Socrates starts out by offering an agreement to the fact that since cities are made of individuals, their characteristics can also be found in individuals....   [tags: justice, value, soul, individual, logic]

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Arguments of Plato in The Republic and Aristotle in Poetics

- What does imitation (mimesis) involve for Plato and Aristotle. Explain its different features. Mimesis, the ‘imitative representation of the real world in art and literature’ , is a form that was particularly evident within the governance of art in Ancient Greece. Although its exact interpretation does vary, it is most commonly used to describe artistic creation as a whole. The value and need for mimesis has been argued by a number of scholars including Sigmund Freud, Philip Sydney and Adam Smith, but this essay will focus on the arguments outlined by Plato in The Republic and Aristotle in Poetics, attempting to demonstrate the different features of imitation (mimesis) and what it involves f...   [tags: imitation, mimesis]

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Plato’s Republic: Proto-traditional Feminism and Modern Feminism

- In book five of Plato’s Republic, Socrates argues that in the ideal city of Kallipolis, both men and women will serve as guardians and auxiliaries. Consequently, Plato appears to endorse feminist ideologies. Firs,t I will define proto-traditional feminism, and modern feminism. I will then argue that Plato presents Socrates, and thereby himself, as an advocate for feminism. However, I will show that Plato is only a feminist under the proto-traditional definition of feminism. He fails to fit the modern definition of feminism, as this definition is contingent on equality and equity....   [tags: Feminism, Plato, proto-traditional]

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The Educated Imagination, by Northrop Frye, Bird by Bird, by Anne Lamott, and The Republic, by Plato

- Can you imagine a world where literature did not exist. It’s very hard, nearly impossible. Literature plays a major role in shaping society. Literature is a word used to describe written or spoken material. Literature educates, informs, entertains and influences the reader or listener in a myriad of profound ways. Broadly speaking, “literature” is used to describe anything from creative writing to more technical or scientific works, but the term is most commonly used to refer to works of the creative imagination....   [tags: Literature's Influence on Society]

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Justice in Plato's Republic

- What is justice. Obviously, the word can have multiple meanings. If we were to walk in the Student Center and ask ten people what justice was, they probably all would have different responses. I am not saying that they would not have some of the same ideas, but ultimately, their responses would vary. Having said that, what if one of the people's ideas of justice included injustices. For example, Adolf Hitler believed that justice would be reached by completely wiping out Jewish people and creating a "perfect" blonde-haired, blue-eyed Aryan race....   [tags: Plato Philosophy Society]

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Justice And Morality Of The Justice System Of Sophocles ' Oresteia And Plato 's Republic And Apology

- Justice is generally thought to be part of one system; equally affecting all involved. We define justice as being fair or reasonable. The complications fall into the mix when an act of heroism occurs or morals are written or when fear becomes to great a force. These complications lead to the division of justice onto levels. In Aeschylus’ Oresteia and Plato’s Republic and Apology, both Plato and Aeschylus examine the views of justice and the morality of the justice system on two levels: in the city-state and the individual....   [tags: Agamemnon, Greek mythology, Plato, Trojan War]

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Glaucon's Challenge and Plato's Theory of Justice in Plato's Republic

- Plato’s Republic focuses on one particular question: is it better to be just or unjust. Thrasymachus introduces this question in book I by suggesting that justice is established as an advantage to the stronger, who may act unjustly, so that the weak will “act justly” by serving in their interests. Therefore, he claims that justice is “stronger, freer, and more masterly than justice” (Plato, Republic 344c). Plato begins to argue that injustice is never more profitable to a person than justice and Thrasymachus withdraws from the argument, granting Plato’s response....   [tags: literary analysis]

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Plato 's Republic And Aristotle 's Politics Deal With The Issue Of Justice

- ... 45). Glaucon says that most people would place justice in the category with medicine, that it is only desired for its consequences. Glaucon even goes so far as to say, “Even those who practice justice do so against their will because they lack the power to do wrong” (p. 46). To prove his point here, Glaucon uses the story of the Ring of Gyges. A shepherd finds a ring that turns him invisible. The shepherd next uses his power to commit adultery on the king’s wife and then attacking the king to take over the kingdom....   [tags: Soul, Plato, Same-sex marriage, Socrates]

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The Republic Is A Socratic Dialogue Written By Plato

- ... Art is essentially an evil to Plato, a skill that deceives children and adults into believing or perhaps influencing actions and behaviors from the message that their art since it preys upon the emotional side in an individual’s heart. In addition, Plato assumes that artists portray a virtue or skill that they claim to have in their writing but have not had the experience or knowledge in these pursuits and thus deceive their audience. For example, “Perhaps they may have come across imitators and been deceived by them; they may have not have remembered when they saw their works that these were imitations thrice removed from the truth, and could easily be made without any knowledge of the...   [tags: Religion, Truth, Reason, God]

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Plato 's The Republic And Thomas Hobbes

- Plato’s The Republic and Thomas Hobbes’ Leviathan are key texts within the conservative tradition. They each explore the human condition and its relationship to society at large. The two theorists recognize the need for a hierarchical form of government to maintain order; however, they differ in their account of the effect of desires, and emotions on political order and hierarchy. Plato asserts that desires lead to the ultimate corruption of society, whereas Hobbes believes that certain innate desires can contribute to peace....   [tags: Thomas Hobbes, Political philosophy, Leviathan]

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Defining Justice in Plato’s the Republic

- Throughout the work of Plato’s the Republic, the true definition of justice is argued. It becomes evident that Plato himself views justice as good because it is connected to the form of the greatest good. Plato’s the Republic also explains that justice is worthwhile for its own sake, in combination with the pleasure and rewards that are accompanied with it. However, because it is natural for men to always be inclined to seek out their own self-gain and benefit, it is obvious that true justice cannot be achieved due to the multiple forms and obstacles that are presented to man-kind....   [tags: soul, enlightened, ethics]

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Comparing Contemporary Politics to Plato's "The Republic"

- Contemporary politics seems to more closely reflect Thraysmachus’ view of justice more so than Plato’s. Contemporary is defined as belonging to the present time adding on to it, politics, which are decisions and actions between parties with power. In “The Republic”, Socrates asks Thraysmachus to give him the answer to his question of what justice is. Thraysmachus was a sophist, who charged people for wisdom. The battle of seeking the true meaning of justice began when Socrates and Polemarchus were arguing....   [tags: justice, power, corruption]

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The Allegory of the Cave in Plato's Republic

- The Allegory of the Cave in Plato's Republic This paper discussed The Allegory of The Cave in Plato's Republic, and tries to unfold the messages Plato wishes to convey with regard to his conception of reality, knowledge and education. THE ALLEGORY OF THE CAVE Plato's "Allegory of the Cave" is a story that conveys his theory of how we come to know, or how we attain true knowledge. It is also an introduction into his metaphysical and ethical system. In short, it is a symbolic explanation of his "Theory of the Forms" (or eidos)....   [tags: Papers]

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Defining the Ideal in Plato's The Republic

- Defining the Ideal in Plato's The Republic In 1921, Vance Palmer, the famous Australian author and poet, noted, in his essay titled "On Boundaries", that "it is the business of thought to define things, to find the boundaries; thought, indeed, is a ceaseless process of definition". As Palmer noted, humans, by their very nature, attempt to define all things. But, more than that, we attempt to redefine subjects and ideas that have already been defined so that we can better understand what they mean, where we came from, and, perhaps most importantly of all, who we are....   [tags: Philosophy Religion Essays]

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Justice and Morality in Plato's Republic

- Introduction This essay discusses and clarifies a concept that is central to Plato's argument in the Republic — an argument in favour of the transcendent value of justice as a human good; that justice informs and guides moral conduct. Plato's argument implies that justice and morality are intimately interconnected, because the excellence and goodness of human life — the best way for a person to live — is intimately dependent upon and closely interwoven with those 'things that we find desirable in themselves and for their consequences [1]....   [tags: justice as a human good]

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Analysis Of Plato 's The Book I Sets The Foundation For The Subsequent Scheme Of The Republic

- ... We need to know form in order to know that, because knowledge of the form goodness is the origin of wisdom (one of the three virtues that compose a soul). On more than one occasion, allusions and references to forms are made throughout Book I. One of the first dialogues we see in Book I is the conversation between Socrates and Cephalus on old age and pleasure. Cephalus asserts that old age brings peace and freedom, but more determinant is “the character of human beings.” (329d) This alludes to the concept of forms, because rationally, someone with exceptional character would have knowledge of the forms and be wise....   [tags: Plato, Soul, Aristotle, Epistemology]

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Knowledge of Good in Plato's The Republic

- An Intellectual Knowledge of Good in Plato’s Republic Socrates might be a wise philosopher but one of his ideas strikes me as particularly naive. In the allegory of the cave, he tells Glaucon that "in the world of knowledge the idea of good appears last of all, and is seen only with an effort [·] and that this is the power upon which he [the intellectual] would act rationally" (517b-c). In other words, he seems to be implying that knowledge of goodness is a sufficient condition for being good....   [tags: Philosophy Religion Essays]

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