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William Butler Yeats Poems

- William Butler Yeats, born in 1865 and died in 1939. Yeats is one of the greatest poets that is well known in the twentieth century. Also a philosophical person, Yeats had developed his own philosophy which states, “Yeats developed a philosophy that united his interest in history, art, personality, and society. His basic insight was that, in all these fields, conflicting forces are at work. In history, for example, as one kind of civilization grows and eventually dies, an opposite kind of civilization is born to take its place....   [tags: poetry, william butler yeats]

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Yeats + Friends

- ‘No poet in our day has written more about his family and friends than Yeats, and no one has been more successful in enlarging them to heroic proportions.' INTRODUCTION I will begin this essay with a brief history of the life of William Butler Yeats in order to secure an understanding of the social and historical context from which he created his works. I will then go on to explain the broad development of Yeats's poetic form, style and technique showing in particular how his works can be separated into two separate periods providing a brief account of the influences in each period on his themes, context and subtexts....   [tags: William Butler Yeats Poetry Family Focus]

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Analysis of William Butler Yeats' Poems

- Analysis of William Butler Yeats' Poems; When You Are Old, The Lake Isle of Innisfree, The Wild Swans at Coole, The Second Coming and Sailing to Byzantium In many poems, short stories, plays, television shows and novels an author usually deals with a main idea in each of their works. A main reason they do this is due to the fact that they either have a strong belief in that very idea or it somehow correlates to an important piece of their life overall. For example the author Thomas Hardy likes to deal with the idea of loss in many different ways within his poems some being positive and some being negative....   [tags: William Yeats, Poetry]

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No Second Troy By William Butler Yeats

- On the surface, William Butler Yeats’s poem No Second Troy, tells the narrative of a man questioning his unrequited loves morality and ideology. However, further reading of the poem gives the reader insight into Yeats’s own feelings towards Irish radical, Maud Gonne, a woman to whom he proposed on numerous occasions unsuccessfully. Gonne had always been more radical than Yeats within her efforts to secure Ireland’s independence from Britain in the first decades of the 20th century, but Yeats persisted in receiving her love, dedicating many of his poems to her, thus showing his obsession to the radical actress....   [tags: Poetry, Question, William Butler Yeats]

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William Butler Yeats’s Life and Achievements

- How can one’s life’s work turn into poetry. One can assume that poetry is only cause from despair. William Butler Yeats’s poetry says otherwise. Yeats uses the strength from his long and dedicated background into poetry. From the time spent as a young boy, seeing different religious views from his family motivated him to excel as a poet entering manhood. Being acknowledged as one of the best English-language poets of the 20th century, William Butler Yeats’s plays, notable poetry, and changes in art made him successful....   [tags: william yeats, poetry, literature]

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The Writer Who Was Irish By William Butler Yeats

- ... Before Yeats could start high school, he and his family relocated to Dublin, Ireland ("William Butler Yeats- William Butler Yeats Biography- Poem Hunter"). Yeats attended high school at Dublin 's Erasmus Smith High School, which was very close to his father 's art studio. William would spend a great amount of time there, where he met many of Dublin 's city artists and writers. During this time was when poetry was becoming popular, and William wrote his first poems. William fell in love with this and attended the Metropolitan School of Art to further his interest....   [tags: William Butler Yeats, Ireland, Irish mythology]

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An Analysis of Yeats' The Second Coming

- An Analysis of Yeats' The Second Coming Yeats' poem "The Second Coming," written in 1919 and published in 1921 in his collection of poems Michael Robartes and the Dancer, taps into the concept of the gyre and depicts the approach of a new world order. The gyre is one of Yeats' favorite motifs, the idea that history occurs in cycles, specifically cycles "twenty centuries" in length (Yeats, "The Second Coming" ln. 19). In this poem, Yeats predicts that the Christian era will soon give way apocalyptically to an era ruled by a godlike desert beast with the body of a lion and the head of a man (ln....   [tags: Yeats Second Coming Essays]

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Analysis Of The Poem ' Easter ' By William Butler Yeats

- ... Subsequently, Three times in the poem, Yeats ends a stanza with the phrase, "A terrible beauty is born." (Easter, 1916 line 16, 20, 80) Whenever he talks about “terrible beauty”, Yeats seems to be trying to bring together the different emotions he feels when he thinks about the Irish Uprising of Easter, 1916. On the one hand, the Uprising is beautiful because it 'll go down in history as a great fight for Irish freedom. On the other hand, a whole bunch of people died that he knew and interacted with on a daily basis....   [tags: Poetry, Easter Rising, William Butler Yeats]

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Byj.b Ni Houlihan By W. B. Yeats And Lady Gregory And The Rising Of The Moon

- Cathleen Ni Houlihan by W. B. Yeats and Lady Gregory and The Rising of the Moon by Lady Gregory demonstrate the impending and never ceasing restlessness of the Irish people and the desire to rebel against British rule. In turn, the playwrights incorporate spirit or spirit-like characters that represent the oppression that the Irish experienced. By the end, the spirit has incited a character to help or follow them in the rebellion. Those who aid the cause of the rebellion are often not supported by anyone else but the spirit....   [tags: William Butler Yeats, Ireland]

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W.B. Yeats and History Essay

- Yeats in Time: The Poet's Place in History All things can tempt me from this craft of verse: One time it was a woman's face, or worse-- The seeming needs of my fool-driven land; Now nothing but comes readier to the hand Than this accustomed toil. In these lines from "All Things can Tempt Me" (40, 1-5), Yeats defines the limitations of the poet concerning his role in present time. These "temptations" (his love for the woman, Maude Gonne, and his desire to advance the Irish Cultural Nationalist movement) provide Yeats with the foundation upon which he identifies his own limitations....   [tags: Poetry Poet Yeats]

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Yeats’ Sailing to Byzantium

- Yeats’ Sailing to Byzantium       In "The Circus Animals' Desertion," W. B. Yeats asserted that his images "[g]rew in pure mind" (630). But the golden bird of "Sailing to Byzantium" may make us feel that "pure mind," although compelling, is not sufficient explanation. Where did that singing bird come from. Yeats's creative eclecticism, blending the morning's conversation with philosophical abstractions, makes the notion of one and only one source for any image implausible: see Frank O'Connor's comments on the genesis of "Lapis Lazuli," for example (211-22)....   [tags: Yeats Sailing Essays]

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The Stolen Child by W.B. Yeats

- The Stolen Child by W.B. Yeats      “The Stolen Child”, a poem by W.B. Yeats, can be analyzed on several levels. The poem is about a group of faeries that lure a child away from his home “to the waters and the wild”(chorus). On a more primary level the reader can see connections made between the faery world and freedom as well as a societal return to innocence. On a deeper and second level the reader can infer Yeats’ desire to see a unified Ireland of simpler times. The poem uses vivid imagery to establish both levels and leaves room for open interpretation especially with the contradictory last stanza....   [tags: Stolen Child Poem Yeats Essays]

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Use of Symbols in Yeats's Work, A Vision

- Use of Symbols in Yeats's Work, A Vision In his 1901 essay "Magic", Yeats writes, "I cannot now think symbols less than the greatest of all powers whether they are used consciously by the masters of magic, or half unconsciously by their successors, the poet, the musician and the artist" (p. 28). Later, in his introduction to A Vision, he explains, "I put the Tower and the Winding Stair together into evidence to show that my poetry has gained in self possession and power. I owe this change to an incredible experience" (Vision p.8)....   [tags: Yeats Vision Essays]

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Poetry Analysis of The Second Coming by Yeats

- Poetry Research Essay analysis THE SECOND COMING By William Butler Yeats, 1922 Mr. Yeats relates his vision, either real or imagined, concerning prophesies of the days of the Second coming. The writer uses the Holy Bible scripture text for his guide for because no one could explain this period of time without referring to the Holy Bible. He has chosen to present it in the form of a poem, somewhat like the quatrains of Nostradamus. The poem does not cover all the details of this event, but does give the beginning of the powerful messages, and a dark look at those ominous days surrounding the Second Coming of The Lord Jesus Christ....   [tags: William Butler Yeats]

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W.B. Yeats' Adam's Curse

- W.B. Yeats' "Adam's Curse" Though written only two years after the first version of "The Shadowy Waters", W.B. Yeats' poem "Adam's Curse" can be seen as an example of a dramatic transformation of Yeats' poetic works: a movement away from the rich mythology of Ireland's Celtic past and towards a more accessible poesy focused on the external world. Despite this turn in focus towards the world around him, Yeats retains his interest in symbolism, and one aspect of his change in style is internalization of the symbolic scheme that underlies his poetry....   [tags: Yeats Poetry Adam's Curse Essays]

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William Butler Yeats

- William Butler Yeats William Butler Yeats was born on June thirteenth, eighteen sixty-five, at ten-forty pm, in Sandymount, Dublin (Foster, 13). He grew up lanky, untidy, slightly myopic, and extremely thin. He had black hair, high cheek bones, olive skin, and slanting eyes (Foster, 34). It was presumed he was Tubercular. As a child he was ridiculed, mainly because of his Irish heritage (Foster, 16). He accomplished many things in his life time. His whole family was highly artistic. He was the eldest of five siblings; Susan Mary, Elizabeth Corbet, Robert Corbet, John butler, and Jane grace....   [tags: Yeats Biography Poem Poet]

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W. B. Yeats, George Hyde-Lees, and the Automatic Script

- W. B. Yeats, George Hyde-Lees, and the Automatic Script In his biography of Yeats, Richard Ellmann remarks that "Had Yeats died instead of marrying in 1917, he would have been remembered as a remarkable minor poet who achieved a diction more powerful than that of his contemporaries but who, except in a handful of poems, did not have much to say with it" (Ellmann 223). Yet with his marriage to Georgie Hyde-Lees on October 21st, 1917, a vast frontier of possibility opened before Yeats, and through the automatic writing of his wife, he felt "wisdom at last within his reach" (Ellmann 224)....   [tags: Yeats Essays]

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Ireland and Irish Nationalism in the Poetry of William Butler Yeats

- Ireland and Irish Nationalism in the Poetry of William Butler Yeats William Butler Yeats was an Irish poet, a dramatist, and a prose writer - one of the greatest English-language poets of the twentieth century. (Yeats 1) His early poetry and drama acquired ideas from Irish fable and arcane study. (Eiermann 1) Yeats used the themes of nationalism, freedom from oppression, social division, and unity when writing about his country. Yeats, an Irish nationalist, used the three poems, “To Ireland in the Coming Times,” “September 1913” and “Easter 1916” which revealed an expression of his feelings about the War of Irish Independence through theme, mood and figurative language....   [tags: William Butler Yeats]

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Dissatisfaction with Society Revealed in Yeats’ Stolen Child

- Dissatisfaction with Society Revealed in Yeats’ Stolen Child The Stolen Child,"a poem by W.B. Yeats, relates the story of a child who is lured away by fairies to a fantasy world illustrated through rich descriptions of nature and the freedom it offers. The plot of the poem becomes a metaphor for the return to innocence that the author feels is necessary in a society that is attempting to lead children away from the mysticism and innocence that characterize childhood, toward a more mundane reality as an adult....   [tags: Yeats Stolen Child Essays]

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Disenchantment with the Modern Age in Yeats' No Second Troy

- Disenchantment with the Modern Age in Yeats' "No Second Troy"       "No Second Troy" expresses Yeats' most direct vision of Maud Gonne, the headstrong Irish nationalist he loved unrequitedly throughout his life. The poem deals with Yeats’ disenchantment with the modern age: blind to true beauty, unheroic, and unworthy of Maud Gonne's ancient nobility and heroism. The "ignorant men," without "courage equal to desire," personify Yeats’ assignment of blame for his failed attempts at obtaining Maud Gonne's love....   [tags: Yeats No Second Troy Essays]

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W.B. Yeats' September 1913 and Easter 1916 Poem

- W.B. Yeats' September 1913 and Easter 1916 Poem Throughout many of his poems, W.B Yeats portrayed important aspects of Ireland’s history especially around the 1900’s when Ireland was fighting for independence. During this time, Ireland was going through an agonizing time of struggle. The Employers’ Federation decided to lock out their workers in order to break their resistance. By the end of September, 25,000 workers were said to have been affected....   [tags: Yeats Poem Poetry ]

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William Butler Yeats' Adam's Curse

- William Butler Yeats' "Adam's Curse" The poem "Adam's Curse" (William Butler Yeats, reprinted in Richard Ellmann and Robert O'Clair. The Norton Anthology of Modern Poetry, 2nd ed. [W.W. Norton & Company, Inc. 1988] 147-148) carries the theme of a curse throughout the poem, and ties it in with experiences in the text. "Adam's Curse" can make connections with three situations that are central to the poem, and they are the following: first, the "pain and hard work" (footnote 6 p147) of deciphering poetry; next, the "pain and hard work" (p147) of being a woman, and finally the "pain and hard work" (p147) of making love work....   [tags: William Yeats Adam Curse Essays]

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The Sidhe, the Tuatha de Danaan, and the Fairies in Yeats's Early Works

- The fin de siecle, or late 1800's, was an era not unlike our own: now we see many seeking "New Age" enlightenment; likewise, Yeats and many of his contemporaries looked for meaning in various areas of the supernatural. Ripe as the late 1800's were for spawning occult study, those were also times of political turmoil for the Irish, and Yeats became involved with Irish nationalism as well. His desire to express this nationalism was given voice through a Celtic literature that he hoped would inform and inspire his countrymen....   [tags: Yeats Papers]

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William Butler Yeats' The Second Coming

- William Butler Yeats' "The Second Coming" The poem “The Second Coming” was written by William Butler Yeats in 1919. Yeats was an accomplished Irish poet and was known for the socio-religious ideas he emphasized in his poetry. In “The Second Coming,” his ideas unfold in three significant metaphors. The first metaphor relates a falcon and its falconer to the destruction of society. The metaphor has two possible interpretations. One view may be that the falcon represents society and the falconer represents God and morality....   [tags: Yeats Second Coming Poem Poetry Essays]

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W.B. Yeats' Poetry

- W.B. Yeats' Poetry Many literary critics have observed that over the course of W. B. Yeats’ poetic career, readers can perceive a distinct change in the style of his writing. Most notably, he appears to adopt a far more cynical tone in the poems he generated in the later half of his life than in his earlier pastoral works. This somewhat depressing trend is often attributed to the fact that he is simply becoming more conservative and pessimistic in his declining years, but in truth it represents a far more significant change in his life....   [tags: W.B. Yeats Poet Poem Essays]

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William Butler Yeats' The Cap and Bells

- William Butler Yeats' The Cap and Bells William Butler Yeats’s ballad “The Cap and Bells” depicts the behavior of love through an allegorical account of actions between a jester and a queen. Through the use of many symbolic references, the dramatic characters accurately reflect a lover’s conduct. Referring to jester-like men throughout many of his works (“A Coat”, “The Fool by the Roadside”, “Two Songs of a Fool”, “The Hour Glass”, etc.), Yeats continually portrays the actions of humans as foolish many a times....   [tags: Poetry William Butler Yeats Cap Bells Essays]

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W.B. Yeats: Nationalistic Reflection in His Poetry

- W.B. Yeats: Nationalistic Reflection in His Poetry William Butler Yeats was an Irish poet, dramatist, and prose writer who was one of most influential poets of the Twentieth century. His talents were celebrated by scholars and activists and, in 1923, Yeats received the Nobel Prize for literature. Through his poetry, Yeats confronted the reality that felt was Oppression and Heartship for himself and his Irish brethren. Armed only with a pen, parchment, and a dissident tongue, Yeats helped to ignite the Powderkeg that was Ireland in the early twentieth century....   [tags: Yeats Poet Biography Biographical Essays]

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Symbolism and Style in Yeats' Byzantium and Joyce's The Dead

- Symbolism and Style in Yeats' “Byzantium” and Joyce's “The Dead” James Joyce and William Butler Yeats are perhaps the two most prominent modernist writers of the twentieth century, and both have left their unique stylistic legacies to English literature. Though these fellow Irishmen wrote at the same time, their drastically different styles reveal distinctions in their characters and standpoints, and comparing them provides intriguing glimpses into two deeply individual minds. One area in which an obvious difference in approach exists is the way each uses symbolism; whereas Yeats often uses a heavy symbolism placed in the foreground of his works to reveal broader truths and ideological bel...   [tags: Yeats Byzantium Joyce Dead Essays]

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Among The School Children by William Butler Yeats

- Among School Children by William Butler Yeats First Published 1927; collected in The Tower, 1928 Type of Poem Meditation The Poem William Butler Yeats' "'Among School Children' is written in eight eight-line stanzas that follow a precise rhyme scheme. Along with the straightforward title, stanza I establishes the immediate context of the action in deliberately prosaic language. The speaker is visiting a schoolroom, and "'a kind old nun,' his guide for the day or perhaps the classroom teacher, is answering his matter-of-fact questions in a rapid, matter-of-fact way....   [tags: Yeats School Children Poem Poetry]

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Yeats’ Second Coming and Cummings’ what if a much of a which of a wind

- The End of the World in Yeats’ Second Coming and Cummings’ what if a much of a which of a wind Hellfire and brimstone, a massive environmental disaster, a third World War; how will the world end. This issue can stop conversations, or start hour long arguments; it can start a religion, or cause people to renounce their faith. The answer to the ubiquitous question of how the world will eventually end is a paradox; to know the answer means that the final hour has come. Both E.E. Cummings and William Butler Yeats express their premonitions about when and why this awesome event may occur....   [tags: Yeats Second Coming Essays]

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Analysis of When You are Old, by William Butler Yeats

- Analysis of When You are Old, by William Butler Yeats      When You are Old, by William Butler Yeats, represents and elderly woman reminiscing of her younger days. A past lover whispers to her as she looks through a photo album. Basically, Yeats is showing that as the woman gets older, she is alone, but she does not have to be lonely. She will always have her memories for companionship.      'When you are old and grey and full of sleep, and nodding by the fire' (l.1-2) depicts the woman in her age, needing to nap more frequently....   [tags: Analysis Old Poem Poetry Yeats Essays Papers]

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The Daimon and Anti-Self Concepts in Per Amica Silentia Lunae by William Yeats

- The Daimon and Anti-Self Concepts in Per Amica Silentia Lunae by William Yeats In July of 1914 Yeats began communicating during seances with a spirit which he called his "daimon," one Leo Africanus, a Renaissance geographer and traveller. At Leo's request, through the voice of the medium, Yeats began a written correspondence in which he would write questions and observations to Leo, and Leo would answer through Yeats's hand. This correspondence would prove influential in Yeats's evolving concept of the sources of artistic inspiration as emanating from the interaction between the physical and the spiritual worlds....   [tags: Per Amica Silentia Lunae William Yeats Essays]

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William Butler Yeats poem, Leda and the Swan and Fred Chappel’s Narcissus and Echo

- William Butler Yeats poem, Leda and the Swan and Fred Chappel’s Narcissus and Echo Poets use many different stylistic devices to capture the attention of the reader. After all, who wants to read a boring poem. Many times, it is the opening line that acts as the "hook." What better way to capture someone's attention than to incite emotion with the first word. Some poets use form to their advantage. Perhaps by writing the words out in different shapes, they will create a broader readership. Some poets use symbolism, or structure to benefit their artistic license....   [tags: Yeats Leda and the Swan Essays]

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Yeats and India

- Introduction Indian philosophy is one of the ingredients which make Yeats modernist poet with his specific brand of modernism. Yeats’s modernism is rooted in a variety of sources such as nineteenth century English poetry, French symbolists, Imagism and so on so forth. Some of the major influences on his poetry include Irish mythology and folklore, European and Eastern mysticism, the occult and magic, the Caballah and Rosicrucianism, French symbolist and Romantic poetry, theosophy and Hindu philosophy....   [tags: Hinduism, paganism, christianity, Ireland]

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The Collected Poems of WB Yeats

- Yeats, B. William. The Collected Poems of WB Yeats. New York: Macmillan, 1996. 318 The importance of this book is that it contains some of the works of poetry which were carried out by William Yeats. Arguably, the most salient feature in the book is the attempt at portraying the shift that characterized Yeats in his work, so that his works are arranged almost chronologically to underscore this standpoint. Works that depict him as a bard of the Celtic Twilight, reviving Rosicrucian symbols and legends are the most frontal....   [tags: Poetry]

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The Life and Poetry of W.B. Yeats

- William Butler Yeats was born on the 13th of June in 1865, in Sandymount, Country Dublin, Ireland. His family was extremely artistic. His father, John Butler Yeats, studied art at Heatherley’s Art School in London, his brother Jack became a well-renowned painter, and his sisters Elizabeth and Susan became involved in the Arts and Crafts movement, which was the use of handmade objects and boycotting mechanical objects. Yeats grew up as a member of the former Protestant Ascendancy, where the changes in Ireland directly disadvantaged him because of his heritage....   [tags: Poets, biography, Biographical]

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Analysis Of The Poem ' The Yeats '

- ... He notes that people are obsessed with having a purpose, which contrasts with his questioning of sacrifice having a purpose. Yeats uses imagery of country life to highlight change, while he uses the symbol of a rock as something that remains the same. He compares the hearts of the revolutionaries to immovable rock. This link and loop between all nature shows that it, like the revolutionaries, all encompass one goal and purpose. The final stanza highlights the negativity of sacrifice, ‘too long a sacrifice/can make a stone of the heart.’ While Yeats glorifies these people, he also feels pity towards them....   [tags: Easter Rising, John MacBride]

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The Life of William Butler Yeats

- ... In 1884, William Yeats joined the Metropolitan School of Art, which is also known as the National College of Art and Design, and studying art till 1886. At this point it became his priority part of his education was meeting other artist and poets. (4) During this time as a young man, he wrote his first individual piece, a poem representing a magician. Since then he started writing poems on various themes and plays. His initial works were greatly influenced with the creations of great poet P.B....   [tags: famous Irish poet]

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An Analysis of William Butler Yeats

- Change is Changelessness “An Analysis of William Butler Yeats” Life is full of change, it is the natural order of things, without change life would be at a standstill, without cause, just an empty world. Change is how new ideas arise, how things become better or worse, without it we wouldn’t be here on this earth. In opposition, there is also a world of changelessness, it is the only thing that remains constant in our lives, there is always change and that gives us the allusion of changelessness....   [tags: philosophy, changelessness]

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William Yeats' Philosophical View

- Having a view of something that is different from what is traditional can often be frowned upon. During the Romantic period, the writers were swaying away from what was considered normal writing at that time. The church was a big influence on everyone during the Renaissance and if any one so much as “stepped out of line” the church made sure they were punished. Going against them was seen as going against God. A man named William Butler Yeats created a unique philosophical system woven from his own insights and the ideas of many thinkers....   [tags: church, renasisance, romantic]

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When You Are Old By. Yeats

- ... Generally, the aforementioned words are not associated with beauty, but with old age and death. Since they are stressed, both the reader and the addressed pay more attention to them. The first word of the poem, “when” though unstressed, reiterates that she will indeed get old. It is not a matter of if she gets old, but instead when she gets old. The certainty of the word “when” paired with the stressed adjectives reveal to the subject an old, alienated version of herself. In doing so, the poet-speaker has created uneasy feelings within the beloved about her ominous future....   [tags: Poetry, Rhyme scheme, Syllable, Rhyme]

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William Butler Yeats: Modernism

- William Butler Yeats: Modernism William Butler Yeats is an Irish poet from the nineteenth century. William Butler Yeats was born in Dublin, Ireland in 1865. He was educated in both Dublin and London, and he wrote his first verse in 1877 (nobelprize.org). He wrote many poems during his lifetime, and is thought to be the most influential poet of his era. He was very influential in the Modernism era. William Butler Yeats was one of the most famous poets from the nineteenth century. Even though William Butler Yeats wrote both Victorian and Modernistic literature, he still had a large impact on the modernistic style....   [tags: dublin ireland, irish poet, death]

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Sailing to Byzantium”: William Butler Yeats

- The enigmatic man, who is William Butler Yeats, has a life full of intense emotion and feeling that causes his experiences to be quite radical to say the least. His early childhood, interest in occults, and many encounters with questionable women truly shaped his lifetime of poetry in many ways. As well his poem “Sailing to Byzantium” had many complex themes, a central theme of time, and gave interesting views on art and experience. There were people of the poetry world that analyzed William Butler Yeats’ work and saw quite an interesting use of symbolism and a strikingly unique use of fantastical imagery....   [tags: passion and spiritualism]

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Why Byzantium, Yeats?

- The poem, Sailing to Byzantium, written by William Butler Yeats, depicts a poet’s internal struggle with his aging as he pursues for a sanctuary that allows him to become one with his soul. The poet, Yeats, is therefore sailing from his native land of Ireland to “the holy city of Byzantium,” because “that” country that he originally lived in belongs to the youth (Yeats 937). This escape from the natural world into a paradise represents the firmness and acceptance of Yeats’ monuments, which consists of his poetry....   [tags: Poetry Analysis ]

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Symbolism in Leda and the Swan by W.B. Yeats

- Tyranny is forceful dominance over innocence. Poetry and other forms of literature often use symbolism as a means to provide a message. The reasons for the usage of symbolism are as varied as the symbols used. Images are not always as they appear, and when one thinks about poetry more abstractly many interpretations can result. In W.B. Yeats’s poem “Leda and the Swan,” Yeats uses the retelling of a classical myth and its connotations to symbolize English dominance over the Irish people. A swan, Zeus transformed, raping a women provides an image of sneakiness, dishonesty, and tyranny....   [tags: Poetry Analysis]

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The Stolen Child By William Butler Yeats

- ... Herons are big birds which always standing still on the side of the water and waiting for fishes. When their preys appear, they would flap their wings to seize their targets. “The drowsy water-rats” (line 5) definitely became the food of the fierce predators. The “reddest stolen cherries” (line 8) are delicious, whereas they are collected through the illegal method. Although the paradise looks peaceful, there are dangerous and conflicts lurked everywhere whereby it explains why the faery is friendly to the child, the invader....   [tags: Metropolitana di Napoli, Madrid Metro]

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The Second Coming, by Willim Butler Yeats

- William Butler Yeats’ “The Second Coming” is one of the famous and well-known poem. It describes an apocalyptic situation in the first stanza while also assuring the readers of the hope of the arrival of a messianic figure in the second. The gloomy, darksome picture that is delineated by Yeats creates a fear in the reader’s mind about the falling worldly conditions as optimistic language later tried to give hope. This feeling of apocalypse came into Yeats’ mind as the world was advancing at a fast speed and he felt it needed to slow down a bit....   [tags: Poetic Analysis, Description]

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Use of Dramatic Contrast in Yeats' Poetry

- Yeats' poetry is very dramatic because he usually creates dramatic contrasts within his poems and because his tone changes regularly. When he wasn't in conflict with the world around him he was in conflict with himself. He was never satisfied with modern Ireland, even when he was younger. As he grew older, his dissatisfaction became even greater. Firstly he uses a sharp contrast in his tone. This is particularly evident in his poem 'September 1913'. He starts by attacking the greedy uncultured people of Ireland, especially the shopkeepers who “add the halfpence to the pence”....   [tags: poets, poem analysis]

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The Second Coming By William Butler Yeats

- William Butler Yeats’s poem, “The Second Coming” represents the view of the African society by the Western Civilization. He and the Europeans renders the African society as a uncivilized, warlike, society comprised of barbaric and savage human beings. However, many people disagree with this, such as the author Chinua Achebe. His goal is to educate and inform the readers that the Africans are not primitive and savage but rather civilized. Achebe demonstrates his views in his book, Things Fall Apart, which shows the Igbo, an African civilization, being a civilized group....   [tags: Things Fall Apart, Chinua Achebe, Igbo people]

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The Second Coming by William Butler Yeats

- An Unexpected Future In his poem "The Second Coming," William Butler Yeats expresses that the endured disastrous behaviors of humankind will result in the beginning of a new age that is gloomy, fearful, and controlled by chaos. The poem provides as a warning of what may lie ahead if we do not change the direction society continues to take. “Turning and turning in the widening gyre the falcon cannot hear the falconer;” The falcon is described as "turning" in a "widening gyre". A gyre is a spiral that expands outward as it goes up....   [tags: poem analysis]

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The Second Coming a Poem by W.B. Yeats

- 'Thing fall apart the centre cannot hold' is a line in W.B Yeats poem 'The Second Coming' because of its stunning, violent imagery and terrifying ritualistic language, "The Second Coming" is one of Yeats's most famous poems, its set in a world on the threshold of apocalypse must like the three texts. The texts 'Henry IV Part 2' by William Shakespeare, 'The Handmaid's Tale' by Margaret Atwood and the poem 'The Waste Land' by T.S Eliot deals with the topic of disintegration of and within civilisation....   [tags: The Waste Land' by T.S Eliot, sex, love]

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Conflicting Themes in The Poetry of W. B. Yeats

- In analysing the poetry of W.B. Yeats, I have come to understand the multiple conflicting themes and positions he presents in his poetry. However, my understanding has been influenced most by Yeats’s exploration of key conflicts in ageing along with political anarchy. These are conveyed respectively in the poems “Wild Swans at Coole” (1916) and “Leda and the Swan” (1923), using the central symbol of the swan. In “Wild Swans at Coole”, Yeats conveys the conflict within his heart; where he is an ageing, old man opposed to the young, revitalised swans....   [tags: Literary Analysis]

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Symbolism and Symbols in the Poetry of W. B. Yeats

- The present research work deals with the development of symbols in the poetry of W. B. Yeats. To comprehend and thereby fully appreciate Yeats’s poetry requires some knowledge of the forces working together to form the basis of his philosophy and the symbolic system Yeat’s view of the artistic function of the imagination and of the symbol and the development of his personal symbolic system are made clear in this chapter. W. B. Yeats has been regarded as a great symbolic poet. Arthur Symons dedicated his book “The Symbolist Movement in Literature (1919)” to W....   [tags: literary analysis, the tower]

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A Literary Analysis of Symbolism in Yeats’s Texts

- There are many different things that can have two meanings in life. Whether it is a certain look that someone gives you, that can mean something special. Or even in a literary way, for example, in the novel series, The Chronicles of Narnia, the Lion, Aslan, symbolizes God. In the Chronicles of Narnia series, Aslan does many different acts that prove that he is symbolized as God. For example, in the most popular book of the series, The Lion the Witch and the Wardrobe, Aslan breathes the breath of life onto many creatures that brings them back to life, and turns them back to normal after the witch turns them into stone....   [tags: faith, experience, peace]

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Turning and Turning: The Evolution of the Poetry of W.B. Yeats

- William Butler Yeats, born in 1865, is regarded as one of the pioneers of poetry in the 1900s. He is most well-remembered for his work focusing on the myths, folklore and history of Ireland, his home nation, but his other pieces have also found their way into the hearts of people around the world past and present. In 1923, he was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for his contributions to English and Irish literature. Along with Ezra Pound and T.S. Elliot, he is one of the most famous canonical Modernist poets: a genre of literature characterized by the use of free verse, concision, and a more musical sound to their writings (Surette)....   [tags: Poetry Analysis ]

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THE SECOND COMING BY WILLIAM YEATS

- William Butler Yeats, a multitalented individual won the Nobel Prize in 1923. Born the son of a well known Irish painter and religious skeptic had many influences in his life. Eventually, he converted to Paganism from Christianity. He is till this day considered one of the greatest poets that ever lived. To understand the meaning of William Butler Yeats poem “The Second Coming”, you must first understand the difference between Christianity and Paganism. Yeats was raised as a Christian and turned to pagan mysticism later in his life....   [tags: essays research papers]

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To Fear, Or Not To Fear: How Yeats and Hardy Envision God

- Within both Thomas Hardy’s “The Convergence of the Twain” and W. B. Yeats’ “The Second Coming”, the actions of God are extremely prevalent, though the timing of His intervention varies greatly. Though, both poems were published within a five year period (1914 and 1919 respectively), they convey significantly different perspectives on the actions of God, in relation to our actions as human beings. These poems were written less than a decade apart, but are separated by one significant event that changed the world: the First World War....   [tags: second coming, thomas hardy, god's will]

Term Papers
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Lord Tennyson and W.B Yeats: A Comparison of Women in Poetry

- Lord Tennyson and W.B Yeats: A Comparison Of Women Poetry, like other forms of written expression, is subject to change with the progression of time and expansion of thought. Victorian poetry and Modern poetry are two genres separated by time, but connected by subject matter. Lord Tennyson, a well-known Victorian poet and W.B Yeats, a respected Modern poet, are both men who found inspiration in the female form. How these two men interpreted that inspiration and expressed it in their poetry differ....   [tags: victorian and modern poetry]

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William Butler Yeats’ The Magi

- William Butler Yeats’ The Magi     Briefly stated, William Butler Yeats’ The Magi is a poem about people who, upon reaching old age, or perhaps just older age, turn to God and the spiritual world for fulfillment and happiness. We are told in the footnote to this poem that, after writing The Dolls, Yeats looked up into the blue sky and imagined that he could see "stiff figures in procession". Perhaps after imagining these figures, Yeats debated within himself whom these pictures could represent....   [tags: The Magi Essays]

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An Analysis of the Poetry of Yeats

- An Analysis of Down by the Salley Gardens One of Yeats' poems, Down by the Salley Gardens is a typical story of inexperienced youth in the realm of love. The final two lines hold the key to the theme of the poem: She bid me take life easy, as the grass grows on the weirs; But I was young and foolish, and now am full of tears. The poem is evidently about the relationship between the narrator and the woman with the "little snow-white feet• and the narrator's failure to be able to cope with that relationship....   [tags: Biography Biographies Essays]

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W.B. Yeats and the Importance of Imagination

- W.B. Yeats and the Importance of Imagination The poetry of the Irish writer WB Yeats celebrates how the human imagination gives meaning to life's struggles. Yeats's vision of human creative power evolves with his writing, broadening from seeing the imagination as the embodiment of human desires to understanding the power of the imagination to inspire others and immortalize the creative spirit. Yeats's work, by embracing this power, embraces the human condition itself, giving dignity to hardships and suffering by transfiguring 'dread' into 'tragedy.' The inevitable suffering described in poems like "Adam's Curse," "The Wild Swans at Coole," and "The Circus Animals' Desertion," is transfigur...   [tags: Biography Biographies Essays]

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The Poetry of W.B. Yeats

- W.B. Yeats, a key figure of the modernist movement of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, was born in Dublin in 1865. Although spending much of his childhood and youth in London, Yeats is seen as an inherently Irish literary figure. Through his early work, employing not only ancient Greek myth, but also Celtic legend, he sought to re-ignite in Ireland notions of heritage and tradition, which had diminished through the years. In Ireland, from around 1890 onwards, there was a very noticeable return to all things Irish, including a re-introduction of the Gaelic language, through the Society for the Preservation of the Irish Language, and the formation of a highly nationalist comm...   [tags: Poetry Poet Modernist Irish Literature]

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Chaos and Fright in William Butler Yeats’ The Second Coming

- In the first stanza of William Butler Yeats’ “The Second Coming”, the speaker paints a picture of chaos and frightening sight. The first image we read is the gyre. “Turning and turning in the widening gyre” (1), Tracy Caldwell says “the gyre refers to Yeats’ personal understanding of cyclical events in history explained in his work, ‘A Vision’, which details the theory of metaphysics and history he claimed to have received from the spirit world” (2). In the second line, the speaker states that order is loose that “the falcon cannot hear the falconer” (2)....   [tags: The Second Coming, poetry, poem, informative]

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The Life and Work of William Butler Yeats

- The Life and Work of William Butler Yeats Born in Dublin in the year 1865, William Butler Yeats would go on to become universally recognized by his peers as the greatest poet of this century writing in the English language. This recognition would come as early as 1828, a decade before his death with the publication of arguably his finest volume, The Tower (Fraser, 207). The son of one time attorney and later well known painter John Butler Yeats, W.B. Yeats was of partially Cornish and Gaelic decent, born near Dublin and raised between both England and Ireland....   [tags: Biography Biographies Essays]

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William Butler Yeats

- William Butler Yeats One of Ireland's finest writers, William Butler Yeats served a long apprenticeship in the arts before his genius was fully developed. He did some of his greatest work after he was fifty. Yeats was born in Dublin, Ireland, on June 13, 1865. His father was a lawyer-turned-Irish painter. In 1867 the family followed him to London and settled in Bedford Park. In 1881 they returned to Dublin, where Yeats studied the Metropolitan School of Art. Yeats spent much time with his grandparents in County Sligo in northwestern Ireland....   [tags: English Literature Essays]

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William Butler Yeats

- On June 13 1865 William Butler Yeats was born in Dublin Ireland. From the start Yeats had artistic influences, due to the fact that his father Jack Butler Yeats was a noted Irish painter. He had no formal education until he was eleven, at that time he started at the Godolphin Grammar School in Hammer*censored*h England and later he enrolled in Erasmus Smith High School in Dublin. Throughout his schooling he was considered disappointing student, his studies were inconsistent, he was prone to day dreaming, and poor at sports....   [tags: essays research papers]

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William Butler Yeats and William Blake

- William Butler Yeats and William Blake A study of William Butler Yeats is not complete without a study of William Blake, just as a study of Blake is greatly aided by a study of Yeats. The two poets are inexorably tied together. Yeats, aided by his study of Blake, was able to find a clearer poetic voice. Yeats had a respect for and an understanding of Blake's work that was in Yeats' time without parallel. Yeats first read Blake at the age of 15 or 16 when his father gave him Blake to read. Yeats writes in his essay "William Blake and the Imagination" that "...when one reads Blake, it is as though the spray of an inexhaustible fountain of beauty was blown into our faces (Yeats, Essays xxx)."...   [tags: Poetry Literature Papers]

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The Feminine in William Butler Yeats' Poetry

- The Feminine in William Butler Yeats' Poetry William Butler Yeats had a long history of involvement with women. He was deeply affected by all types of women; from love interests with Mrs. Olivia Shakespear, Maud Gonne and her adopted daughter Iseult, to a partnership and friendship with Lady Gregory, to marriage with Georgie Hyde-Lees, and finally the birth of his own daughter Anne Yeats. These relationships are reflected in his poetry on many different and multi-layered levels. The mentions of women in his work gives the readers some historical content as well as show the development of his feminine idea....   [tags: Poems Women femininity]

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William Butler Yeats

- William Butler Yeats was born in Dublin, Ireland, on June 13, 1865. He was the eldest son of a painter. In 1867 his family moved to London, but he frequently visited his grandparents in Northern Ireland. There he was greatly influenced by the folklore of the region. In 1881 his family returned to Dublin. Their Yeats studied at the Metropolitan School of Art. During school he became more focused on literature. Yeats made his debut in 1885, with the publication of his first poems in The Dublin University Review....   [tags: Biography]

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Blake vs. Yeats

- BLAKE VS. YEATS William Butler Yeats was a great poet from the twentieth century. His ideal world was made up of a spiritual journey and a spiritual transformation. Yeats ideal world was based on art and aesthetics of the natural world. He wanted permanence and something that would last forever. However, William Blake, a romantic poet from the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, had ideas that revolved around God and His impact on his life. Blake wanted a place that established balance, understanding, and wisdom....   [tags: Poetry]

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Elizabeth Barrett-Browning and W.B. Yeats

- Elizabeth Barrett-Browning and W.B. Yeats   Elizabeth Barrett-Browning and W.B. Yeats, examined together in the same sitting are as different as the Victorian and Post-Modernist eras they emerged from, yet they were both independent thinkers of their time.          Browning, born in 1806 before Victorianism came into full play, was celebrated as a woman poet but also quite conformist to the Victorian movement in some regards.  Browning did make use of her family's money to "give herself an exceptional education"  (1858) and she thought outside of traditional lines in regards to gender roles for women as in her poem "Aurora Leigh".  In this poem, the narrator is a woman which i...   [tags: Biography Biographies Essays]

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William Butler Yeats

- William Butler Yeats - An Irish poet, dramatist, and prose writer - Known for having intellectual and often obsucure poetry works - Quoted to be “one of the greatest English-language poets of the 20th century” - Even Received the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1923 o What was most recognizable about that fact is that he is famous for his lyrical poetic works that came after the prize - Yeats war born in 1865 in Dublin Yeats's childhood was broad in education and personal experiences....   [tags: essays research papers]

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William Butler Yeats

- William Butler Yeats. William Butler Yeats was the major figure in the cultural revolution which developed from the strong nationalistic movement at the end of the 19th century. He dominated the writings of a generation. He established forms and themes which came to be considered as the norms for writers of his generation. Yeats was a confessional poet - that is to say, that he wrote his poetry directly from his own experiences. He was an idealist, with a purpose. This was to create Art for his own people - the Irish....   [tags: essays research papers]

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"The Second Coming" by William Butler Yeats

- From the title of W.B. Yeats poem, "The Second Coming", one might expect to read about the glorious return of Christ to save his followers. However, Yeats portrays a dismal world where anarchy reigns over the innocence of man. The passage portrays a dark and foreboding atmosphere that serves as a warning to what may lie ahead for humankind if we continue on our current path. The poem appears to be written in free verse which adds to the poems references to "things falling apart" and "anarchy loosed upon the world." This lack of structure within the poem helps the reader feel as if they are a part of Yeats' condemned world....   [tags: Poetry Analysis]

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Analysis of the Elegy, In Memory of W.B. Yeats

- In his elegy, “In Memory of W.B. Yeats,” written in 1939, English poet W.H. Auden asserted that “poetry makes nothing happen.” He went on: “it survives / In the valley of its saying where executives / Would never want to tamper …” The studied ambiguity of Auden’s lines makes it possible to read his meaning in a variety of ways. Mourning the death of a fellow poet, Auden may be lamenting the ultimate futility of Yeats’ life and art (and by implication his own). What could be less relevant to the world of “executives” and meaningful action or social change than poetry....   [tags: W.H. Auden English Poetry]

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Sociopolitical Philosophy In The Works Of Stoker And Yeats

- Sociopolitical Philosophy in the Works of Stoker and Yeats Around the turn of this century there was widespread fear throughout Europe, and especially Ireland, of the consequences of the race mixing that was occurring and the rise of the lower classes over the aristocracies in control. In Ireland, the Protestants who were in control of the country began to fear the rise of the Catholics, which threatened their land and political power. Two Irish authors of the period, Bram Stoker and William Butler Yeats, offer their views on this “problem” in their works of fiction....   [tags: essays research papers]

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Easter 1916, Wild Swans at Coole and Second Coming, by W.B. Yeats

- The timeless essence and the ambivalence in Yeats’ poems urge the reader’s response to relevant themes in society today. This enduring power of Yeats’ poetry, influenced by the Mystic and pagan influences is embedded within the textual integrity drawn from poetic techniques and structure when discussing relevant contextual concerns. “Wild Swans at Coole”, “Easter 1916” and “The Second Coming” encapsulate the romanticism in his early poetry to civil influences and then a modernist approach in the later years....   [tags: Theme, Literary Analysis, Influences]

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Crazy Jane Talks with the Bishop by W.B. Yeats: Themes and Symbolism

- Essay - Yeats Crazy Jane Talks with the Bishop: Themes and Symbolism W.B. Yeats had a very interesting personal life. He chased after Maud Gonne, only to be rejected four times. Then, when she was widowed, he proposed to her only out of a sense of duty, and was rejected again. He then proposed to her daughter, who was less than half his age. She also rejected his proposal. Soon after, he proposed to Georgie Hyde Lees, another girl half his age. She accepted, and they had a successful marriage, apart from some indiscretions on his part....   [tags: Sin, Sexuality, Chastisement]

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Analysis Of The Poem ' After Love, And William Butler Yeats ' By Sara Teasdale

- Love poems are usually what one thinks about when it comes to poetry. Usually the gushy, mushy, and all together very sappy kind. But what happens when the roses and violets wither and love ends. Many people do not dare think about life after love, because, for many, it is a painful thought. For some love fades slowly like a sunset and others end as quickly as lightning flashes. The topic of love and its flight from people’s lives is written in Sara Teasdale’s “After Love” and William Butler Yeats’ “Ephemera.” One thing is agreed, that all good things must come to an end, but how you take this ending reflects not only who you are as a character, but also the dynamic of your past relationsh...   [tags: Metropolitana di Napoli, Madrid Metro, Love]

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`` Leda And The Swan `` : The Great Famine Of The 1940 ' S

- Born in 1865 Yeats grew up in a country that was still recovering from the Great famine of the 1940 's. Yeats was born an Anglo-Irishman in Sandymount County Dublin, Ireland. His father was a descendant of Jervis Yeats who had been a famous painter who died in 1712. William Butler Yeats 's father married his wife while he was studying law but abandoned his studies to focus on art at Heatherley 's Art School in London. Susan Mary Pollexfen was from a wealthy family. After the marriage and birth of William Butler Yeats the family relocated to the Pollexfen home to stay with Susan 's extended family....   [tags: William Butler Yeats, Ireland]

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